Practical Approaches to Using Learning Styles in Higher Education

By Rita Dunn; Shirley A. Griggs | Go to book overview

Chapter 15
Teaching Graduate Students with a Learning-Styles Approach: Adding Zest to the Course Ingredients
Laura Shea Doolan

Rushed and harried after a busy day, I answered the phone on its second ring. It was a call from the university. "Are you available to teach Education 7232? It starts on Tuesday of next week."

I was excited. This was the area in which I was most interested--a graduate course on learning styles! But I had so many things to do this semester, and I was preparing to leave for Bermuda as a Teaching Assistant for another course on learning styles.

"May I call you back on Monday? I have to see if I can adjust my schedule," I asked. And so, I had a few days to ponder what and how I would teach a course on learning styles while using a learning-styles approach.


TEACHER EDUCATION
I realized that graduate students with varied backgrounds register for this master's-level course. According to Dunn and Dunn ( 1999), at least part of the continuing need for teacher education is based on one or more of the following widely recognized problems in school districts throughout the nation. There is a widely acknowledged:
lack of research-based instruction that evidences increased student achievement and improved attitudes toward schooling across the board;
use of new instructional approaches for which advocates claim remarkable gains-- without research documentation;
failure among educators to insist on published experimental studies to demonstrate the accuracy of the elaborate media claims of either traditional or innovative programs' successes;

-135-

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