The Life of Charlotte Brontë - Vol. 2

By E. C. Gaskell | Go to book overview

CHAPTER VII.

HER father was always anxious to procure every change that was possible for her, seeing, as he did, the benefit which she derived from it, however reluctant she night have been to leave her home and him beforehand. This August she was invited to go for a week to the neighbourhood of Bowness, where Sir James Kay Shuttleworth had taken a house; but she says, "I consented to go, with reluctance, chiefly to please Papa, whom a refusal on my part would much have annoyed; but I dislike to leave him. I trust he is not worse, but his complaint is still weakness. It is not right to anticipate evil, and to be always looking forward with an apprehensive spirit; but I think grief is a two-edged sword, it cuts both ways; the memory of one loss is the anticipation of another."

It was during this visit at the Briery-- Lady Kay Shuttleworth having kindly invited me to meet her there--that I first made acquintance with Miss Brontë. If I copy out part of a letter, which I wrote soon after this to a friend, who was deeply interested in her writings, I shall probably convey my first impressions more truly and freshly than by amplifying what I then said into a longer description.

"Dark when I got to Windermere station; a drive along

-140-

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The Life of Charlotte Brontë - Vol. 2
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents of Vol. II v
  • Life of Charlotte Brontë. 1
  • Chapter II 14
  • Chapter III 70
  • Chapter IV 93
  • Chapter V 114
  • Chapter VI 128
  • Chapter VII 140
  • Chapter VIII 150
  • Chapter IX 164
  • Chapter X 184
  • Chapter XI 210
  • Chapter XII 225
  • Chapter XIII 242
  • Chapter XIV 267
  • D. Appleton & Company's Publications. 7 271
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