Communication in the Presidential Primaries: Candidates and the Media, 1912-2000

By Kathleen E. Kendall | Go to book overview

Chapter 3
Speeches and Debates
for Dozens . . . and Millions

The primaries: "They tell whether a candidate can frame a message and present it effectively in both speeches and ads to a variety of constituencies."

-- David Broder, Washington Post, April 27, 1992

During the 1952 presidential primaries, Senator Robert A. Taft spoke in Brookline, Massachusetts. The author and her father went to hear him. Though Taft's words are long forgotten, the event is not. It was exciting just to be in the presence of someone who might be the future president. Presidential candidates need to capture the attention of the voters, and speech making is one of the traditional ways they accomplish this. They also use the occasion to lay out their vision of the future under their presidency.

Ever since the Greek polis there has been a close relationship between democratic politics and public speaking. In a democracy, those who lead must continually communicate with the public, in a circular process of interaction, in order to govern successfully. Speeches are one of the main ways to do that. The great English historian Macaulay said that "Parliamentary government is government by speaking" ( June 1859, Harper's, in Baker, June 8, 1996). Even in the age of television, the speeches of political leaders continue to occupy a major place in public life, though presented in truncated form through summaries by political reporters ( Kendall, 1993). This chapter will explore the nature of public speaking and debate in the presidential primaries from 1912 to 1992, noting especially any qualities distinctive to primaries, and the changes over time.

-53-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Communication in the Presidential Primaries: Candidates and the Media, 1912-2000
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 258

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.