American Women Writers to 1800

By Sharon M. Harris | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

Over an eight-year period, the number of individuals to whom I have become indebted is far too numerous to list. It is my sincere hope that they know who they are and that I have extended my appreciation throughout the years in which I have been engaged with this project. Friends, other scholars, colleagues, and students alike deserve my deepest thanks. Four individuals do deserve special mention: Carla Mulford, for her abiding support; Lydia Kualapai, for her expert research assistance; Elizabeth Maguire, an editor whose support and patience have been notable; and Dana Nelson for her astute reading at an early stage.

I wish to acknowledge several institutions from which I have received support for this project: a National Endowment for the Humanities Travel to Collections Grant; the Maude Hammond Fling Summer Research Grant from the University of Nebraska Research Council; and a Summer Research Grant from Temple University.

I also wish to thank the following individuals and institutions for their support and/or permissions to publish materials included in the anthology: the American Philosophical Society; The British Library (MSS/CMH/1224, 1963); The Cincinnati Historical Society; Colonial Society of Massachusetts; The Quaker Collection, Haverford College; the Corbit-Higgins-Spruance Papers, Historical Society of Delaware; Georgia Historical Society Library; the Hatfield Historical Society and Mr. and Mrs. Roswell S. Billings; the Simon Gratz Manuscripts Collection, the Society Collection, the Bartram Papers, the Logan Papers, the Pemberton Papers, the Parrish Collection, Sarah Wister Journal, and the Drinker-Sandwith Papers, Historical Society of Pennsylvania; the Library Company of Philadelphia; the Library of Congress; Mary K. Goddard Papers, MS. 1517, Maryland Historical Society; the Massachusetts Historical Society; the Moravian Historical Society; the National Archives of Canada; New Hampshire Historical Society, Josiah Bartlett Papers; the Van Rensselaer Manor Papers (7079), The New York State Library; The Oyster Bay Historical Society; the South Carolina Historical Society; Durrett Collection, Department of Special Collections, the University of Chicago Library; the University of New Mexico Press; the Virginia Historical Society; the Hillhouse Family Papers, Yale University Library; and The Adams Family Correspondence (3: Apr. 1778-Sep. 1780), eds. L. H. Butterfield and Marc Friedlaener ( Cambridge, MA: Belknap P of Harvard UP, 1973), reprinted by permission.

-v-

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American Women Writers to 1800
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgments v
  • Contents vii
  • Note on the Text xii
  • Introduction 3
  • I- The Ages of Women 31
  • Youthful Reflections 41
  • On Women''s Education 63
  • Domestic Records 79
  • Businesswomen''s Writings 105
  • "Death-Bed" Declarations Skate''Ne (choctaw) 123
  • II- Emerging Feminist Voices 133
  • Feminist Visions 137
  • III- Origins, Revolutions, and Women in the Nations 161
  • First Women 173
  • Spiritual Narratives 197
  • Captivity Narratives and Travel Journals 217
  • Epistolary Exchanges 235
  • Petitions, Political Essays, and Organizational Tracts 251
  • Revolutionary War Writings 269
  • Poetry 303
  • Histories 349
  • Drama 373
  • Novels 393
  • Notably Early American Women 413
  • Selected Bibliography 421
  • Index 432
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