American Women Writers to 1800

By Sharon M. Harris | Go to book overview

Businesswomen's Writings

Martha Daniell Logan ( 1704-1779)

Martha Daniell was born in St. Thomas Parish, South Carolina, on December 29, 1704, to Martha Wainwright and Robert Daniell, a deputy-governor. Robert Daniell died in the spring of 1718, and Martha married George Logan, Jr., on July 30, 1719; she was fourteen years old. Rather than confining her talents to traditional domestic duties, Daniell Logan recast the domestic arena as a place of business. She ran a boarding house and school in Wando River, South Carolina, on land she had inherited from her father and where she and George had settled after their marriage. Daniell Logan gave birth to eight children, six of whom lived to adulthood. Not only did she run the plantation and boarding school at Wando River, but she also established a boarding school in Charleston after the family moved to that city, and she acted as an attorney for one of her sons in the sale of properties he owned.

Daniell Logan's greatest talents were as a horticulturalist. By 1753 she was placing advertisements in the South Carolina Gazette, noting that seeds and roots were available for sale at her home. She corresponded with other botanists, such as John Bartram, and published a "Gardners Kalendar" as early as 1752; it was reprinted several times in various almanacs, the last printing occurring in the 1780s. In 1796, after her death, the most extensive version of her "Gardners Kalendar," and her first signed writing, was published in The Palladium of Knowledge and was repeated in issues through 1804. She not only cultivated her own extensive gardens, which supplied other botanists with samples, but she also gathered her roots and seeds from various neighbors' property as well as her own--she mentions Mrs. Bee, Mr. Raper, Mr. Glen, and Mrs. Hopton, among others, as contributors to her naturalist studies.

____________________
Works: Letters, Gardners Kalendar ( 1752). Bibliography: Earle, Colonial Dames.

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American Women Writers to 1800
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgments v
  • Contents vii
  • Note on the Text xii
  • Introduction 3
  • I- The Ages of Women 31
  • Youthful Reflections 41
  • On Women''s Education 63
  • Domestic Records 79
  • Businesswomen''s Writings 105
  • "Death-Bed" Declarations Skate''Ne (choctaw) 123
  • II- Emerging Feminist Voices 133
  • Feminist Visions 137
  • III- Origins, Revolutions, and Women in the Nations 161
  • First Women 173
  • Spiritual Narratives 197
  • Captivity Narratives and Travel Journals 217
  • Epistolary Exchanges 235
  • Petitions, Political Essays, and Organizational Tracts 251
  • Revolutionary War Writings 269
  • Poetry 303
  • Histories 349
  • Drama 373
  • Novels 393
  • Notably Early American Women 413
  • Selected Bibliography 421
  • Index 432
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