American Women Writers to 1800

By Sharon M. Harris | Go to book overview

III
Origins, Revolutions, and Women in the Nations

In Part III, women's writings are viewed from several perspectives: over time, from Native peoples and the first settlers to participants in the War for Independence to second- and third-generation Americans; and in terms of the numerous genres that women explored as forms in which to express their personal feelings, religious beliefs, philosophical debates, and literary talents. Although important individually, cumulatively these documents also detail American women's intellectual history in a way that informs our understanding of how someone like Judith Sargent Murray came to write her proclamation on equality. Although many of these accounts are not in traditional literary forms, the letters, diaries, and other modes of personal expression, when combined with published texts (from petitions to plays), challenge our conceptions of what we mean by "literature," by the recording of history, and by women's roles in Native, colonial, revolutionary, and federal America. Cumulatively, these texts also begin to define early women's poetics and therein offer many opportunities for reconceptualizing studies of later women's writings and early American studies in general.

The title of the "First Women" section is intended both as an ironic and a serious designation. In the former mode, it is meant as a satirical juxtaposition with the concept of "First Ladies," that ubiquitous term that identifies women only in relation to their renowned spouses. While some of the women writers in this section may meet that criterion, it is for their own contributions that they have been included in this anthology. In the latter mode, "First Women" is intended specifically to emphasize that the true first women were those who were native to the North American continent for centuries before European settlement. Rather than continue separatist distinctions, however, it also refers to women who recorded their initial responses to resettlement in a foreign region.

There is another level on which the authors included in this section and throughout the anthology need to be understood. The eighteenth century's international redefinition of the concept of genius into a highly gendered and exclusionary realm acted as a major instrument in the exclusion of women from the designation of "first-rate" thinkers and writers. The terminology of "intellectual" or "original" artistry has excluded--and continues to exclude--

-161-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
American Women Writers to 1800
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgments v
  • Contents vii
  • Note on the Text xii
  • Introduction 3
  • I- The Ages of Women 31
  • Youthful Reflections 41
  • On Women''s Education 63
  • Domestic Records 79
  • Businesswomen''s Writings 105
  • "Death-Bed" Declarations Skate''Ne (choctaw) 123
  • II- Emerging Feminist Voices 133
  • Feminist Visions 137
  • III- Origins, Revolutions, and Women in the Nations 161
  • First Women 173
  • Spiritual Narratives 197
  • Captivity Narratives and Travel Journals 217
  • Epistolary Exchanges 235
  • Petitions, Political Essays, and Organizational Tracts 251
  • Revolutionary War Writings 269
  • Poetry 303
  • Histories 349
  • Drama 373
  • Novels 393
  • Notably Early American Women 413
  • Selected Bibliography 421
  • Index 432
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 452

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.