Women and Western American Literature

By Helen Winter Stauffer; Susan J. Rosowski | Go to book overview

NOTES
1.
Marcus Lee Hansen, The Immigrant in American History ( Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press, 1948), p. 191.
2.
Oscar Handlin, The Uprooted ( Boston: Little, Brown and Company, 1951), p. 5.
3.
Theodore C. Blegen, Land of Their Cboice (St. Paul, Minnesota: University of Minnesota, 1955), p. v.
4.
Fritz Ritter, my grandfather, was a widower for thirty-four years. He said little about Marie Louise, but in his room he had a large picture of her, and when he spoke of her it was with emotion. Six years after his death, I traveled to Europe and visited Iffwyl to see where my grandparents lived before they immigrated. During my visit, I met many relatives and learned for the first time that after my grandmother's death there had been no communication between the families until the letter telling them I would arrive for a visit. I also learned that Marie Louise, their aunt and my grandmother, had maintained this correspondence from 1893 to 1925. These letters were kept by her sister Anna until her death in 1951. Then the letters were kept by Anna's youngest daughter, Klara. It was in her home that I was shown the letters and learned of their importance to the Swiss branch of the family. In 1972, Klara gave me most of the letters. She said that they now meant more to me than they would to anyone of the next generation in Switzerland. These letters provide me with knowledge of the grandmother I never knew.
5.
Marie Louise Ritter, Series of Unpublished Letters, 1893-1925, translated by Marie Rosenblatt, edited by Darlene Ritter, 27 August 1893. Subsequent quotations will be in the text with the date indicated within parentheses.
6.
Willa Cather, O Pioneers! ( Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 1962), pp. 29-30.

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