Women and Western American Literature

By Helen Winter Stauffer; Susan J. Rosowski | Go to book overview

NOTES

I would like to express my gratitude to the students at the University of Colorado 1976-1977 with whom I developed the thoughts in this paper: Jim Balogh, Libby Comeaux, Rebecca Hensley, Riley Kyle, Roseanna Sneed, Carolyn Stefanco-Schill, Lana Waldron and Faith Williams; to the FIPSE-MLA Project "Teaching Women's Literature From a Regional Perspective" for financial support; and to Sheryll Patterson-Black and Sarah Jacobus for their sharing friendship out of which this paper grew.

1.
Lines from An Old House in America," from Poems, Selected and New, 1950-1974 by Adrienne Rich. © 1975, 1973, 1971, 1969, 1966, by W. W. Norton & Company, Inc.
2.
Mollie: The Journal of Mollie Dorsey Sanford (Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 1976), pp. 144-145.
3.
"Diary of Amelia Buss," Special Collections, Colorado State University Library, Fort Collins, Colorado. A version of the diary, edited by Susan Armitage, is forthcoming by Cottonwood Press, Crawford, Nebraska.
4.
Mollie, p. 166.
5.
Elizabeth Sayre Diary 1879, in Hal Sayre Papers, Western History Archives, Norlin Library, University of Colorado, Boulder.
6.
Mabel Barbee, Cripple Creek Days ( New York: Doubleday, 1958).
7.
Barbee, p. 169.
8.
Barbee, p. 231.
9.
Isabella Bird, A Lady's Life in the Rocky Mountains ( Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1960), p. 47.

-49-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Women and Western American Literature
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 331

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.