Women and Western American Literature

By Helen Winter Stauffer; Susan J. Rosowski | Go to book overview

NOTES
1.
Most general critics of Garland have to some extent discussed his attitudes toward feminism and woman's equality, particularly in terms of his novel Rose of Dutcber's Coolly, which is treated in most detail by Donald Pizer in his introduction to the Bison edition of the novel ( Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 1969, pp. vii-xxiv). In addition, the 1977 Western Literature Association conference produced four papers dealing entirely with Garland and women. George Day's "Can Rose Dutcher Find Happiness in Liberation" expands on Pizer's analysis, but does not substantially differ with it. Roger E. Carp "Hamlin Garland and the Cult of True Womanhood", recently republished in L. L. Lee and Merrill Lewis, eds., Women, Women Writers, and the West ( Troy, New York: Whitston Publishing Company, 1979), is the most ambitious of these in trying to put Garland in context, but Carp emphasis on the "Cult of True Womanhood" leads him to overlook complexity in both the feminist movement and in Garland's responses. Gary Culbert "Hamlin Garland and the Twentieth Century Woman" is an excellent account of Garland's betrayals of the later feminist movement, but avoids many of the personal complexities involved in Garland's stand. Robert Gish "Desertion and Rescue on the Dakota Plains: Hamlin Garland in the Land of the Straddle-Bug" is a Freudian discussion of Garland's "family romance," which finally disappoints because of Gish's attempt to judge Garland's feminism by "today's" standards.
2.
Background information on the nineteenth century feminist movement comes from Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Susan B. Anthony, and Matilda Joslyn Gage, eds., The History of Woman Suffrage ( 1882; rpt. New York: New York Times/Arno Press, 1969) I-III, and ed. Susan B. Anthony and Ida Husted Harper, The History of Woman Suffrage ( 1902; rpt. New York: New York Times/Arno Press, 1969), IV.
3.
Arena, 3 ( 1891), xxi.
4.
Herbert Spencer, Social Statics ( 1850; rpt. New York: R. Schalkenbach Foundation, 1954), pp. 152-153.

-158-

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