effect upon the blushing girl; and the example, being contagious, was followed both by the doctor and Mr. Brownlow: some people affirm that Harry Maylie had been observed to set it, originally, in a dark room adjoining; but the best authorities consider this downright scandal: he being young and a clergyman.

' Oliver, my child,' said Mrs. Maylie, 'where have you been, and why do you look so sad? There are tears stealing down your face at this moment. What. is the matter?'

It is a world of disappointment; often to the hopes we most cherish, and hopes that do our nature the greatest honour.

Poor Dick was dead!


CHAPTER LII
Fagin's last night alive

THE court was paved, from floor to roof, with human faces. Inquisitive and eager eyes peered from every inch of space. From the rail before the dock, away into the sharpest angle of the smallest corner in the galleries, all looks were fixed upon one man -- Fagin. Before him and behind: above, below, on the right and on the left: he seemed to stand surrounded by a firmament, A bright with gleaming eyes.

He stood there, in all this glare of living light, with one hand testing on the wooden slab before him, the other held to his ear, and his head thrust forward to enable him to catch with greater distinctness every word that fell from the presiding judge who was delivering his charge to the jury. At times, he turned his eyes sharply upon them to observe the effect of the slightest featherweight in his, favour; and when the points against him were stated with terrible

-496-

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