Storymaking in Elementary and Middle School Classrooms: Constructing and Interpreting Narrative Texts

By Joanne M. Golden | Go to book overview

5
Individual Readers' Reactive Texts
The focus of this chapter is on how individual readers transform au-
thors' texts into stories through connecting, predicting, inferencing,
and integrating information to formulate narrative elements. These
processes are evident in the variety of reactive texts that students pro-
duce in classroom settings. Examining readers' reactive texts provides
information about how they draw on the author's text and resources
outside the text to construct and interpret stories. Examples of stu-
dents' reactive texts at different grade levels illustrate their role in
storymaking.

Readers do more than assemble the narrative. They also engage in interpretive activities such as weighing and valuing information and drawing conclusions about the narrative world. Moreover, the reader finds significance in the narrative by connecting it to self and world. The outcome of these and other textual practices is a story world, theoretically reflecting equal parts of the text and the reader ( Iser, 1978).

In classroom contexts, the reader may be expected to voice his or her interpretation of the story world in oral, written, or visual form for the teacher, and perhaps classmates. These productions also are social in nature. Individual texts are influenced by the teacher's expectations of what kind of texts are acceptable. Because these articulations provide glimpses into stories readers create from authors' texts, the teacher reads students' responses for purposes of assessment.

-81-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Storymaking in Elementary and Middle School Classrooms: Constructing and Interpreting Narrative Texts
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface xi
  • I- Social Semiotics And Classroom Texts 1
  • 1- Storymaking In the Classroom 3
  • 2- The Author's Text 19
  • II- Storymaking In Classrooms 39
  • 3- The Teacher as Mediator 41
  • 4- Constructing Reactive Texts in Discussion Groups 66
  • 5- Individual Readers' Reactive Texts 81
  • 6- Intertextuality in Text And Discourse 102
  • III- Issues, Directions, And Textual Practices 125
  • 7- Toward a Dialogue: Questions and Issues 127
  • 8- Developing Storymaking Abilities in Classrooms 142
  • References 152
  • Author Index 157
  • Subject Index 159
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 164

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.