No Fairer Land: Studies in Southern Literature before 1900

By J. Lasley Dameron; James W. Mathews | Go to book overview

No Fairer Land
Studies in Southern Literature Before 1900

edited by
J. Lasley Dameron and James W. Mathews

The Whitston Publishing Company
Troy, New York
1986

-i-

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No Fairer Land: Studies in Southern Literature before 1900
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Acknowledgments iii
  • Contents vi
  • Preface viii
  • Introduction 1
  • Notes 7
  • The Princess Pocahontas and Three Englishmen Named John 8
  • Notes 19
  • The "True Narrative" of Bacon's Rebellion 21
  • Notes 30
  • Sir John Randolph: Jurist, Public Servant, and Scholar 32
  • Notes 46
  • Pre-Romantic Aspects of Samuel Davies' Verse 50
  • Notes 63
  • Some Other Versions of Pastoral: the Disturbed Landscape in Tales of the Antebellum South 67
  • Notes 84
  • Trying to Walk: An Introduction to the Plays of St. George Tucker 87
  • Notes 99
  • A Yankee Southerner: the Aesthetic Flight of Samuel Gilman 101
  • Notes 108
  • The Kentucky Tragedy and Its Primary Sources 110
  • Notes 122
  • Tragic Ingenue: Memories of Elizabeth Arnold Poe 124
  • Notes 142
  • Metrical Ambiguity in the Poetry of Edgar Allan Poe 144
  • Notes 157
  • Poe's Auguste Dupin 159
  • Notes 169
  • "His Right of Attendance": the Image of the Black Man in the Works of Poe and Two of His Contemporaries 172
  • Notes 182
  • Divided Loyalties in the American Revolution 185
  • Notes 197
  • Some Adventures of Captain Simon Suggs: the Legacy of Johnson Jones Hooper 200
  • Notes 208
  • J. H. Ingraham: A Bibliography of Periodical Publications, Newspaper Writings, and Parish Reports 211
  • Notes 213
  • George Washington Harris's "Special Vision": His Yarns as Historical Sourcebook 226
  • Notes 237
  • Appendix 242
  • Contributors 243
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