Spurious Issues: Race and Multiracial Identity Politics in the United States

By Rainier Spencer | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

It is a difficult thing to separate oneself from one's work, and it is difficult also to separate the people and experiences that have contributed to who one is from the people and experiences that have contributed directly and indirectly to the work one does. Recognizing this, I shall nonetheless make the attempt to acknowledge those persons who have been especially important to me in my writing this book.

Happily, though, the question of where to begin presents no problem. The most important people in my life have been two women whose assistance and guidance have been so fundamental that I literally cannot imagine having arrived where I am without them. The first is my wife, Jackie, without whose help and support I would not have even entered the realm of scholarly pursuits. Her sacrifices, and those of our daughter, Nicole, especially during the difficult and trying doctoral program years, represent a debt I can only hope to one day repay.

The single most important person in my professional life has been my teacher, mentor, adviser, critic, and good friend Patricia Penn-Hilden. Through her personal example and the scholarly rigor she demands in her work as well as in the work of others, and by showing more genuine care and concern for students than any other professor I have ever known, she has opened for me a vast array of intellectual doors whose existence I had not even imagined. In terms of the manuscript itself, it was Pat who unfailingly and mercilessly sent me back to the drawing board time and time again when the present book existed as a dissertation-in-progress. Her persistence was the best thing that could have happened to me, though, and my writing has benefited immensely from her attention and consideration. She also graciously provided reviews as the project moved toward finally becoming a proper book manuscript. Both Pat and her husband, Timothy Reiss, hold a special place in my heart for all they have been to me.

Certainly, I owe a great debt to Emory University, especially to its Graduate Institute of the Liberal Arts. I did the vast majority of my library research, particularly relating to government documents, at Emory's Robert W. Woodruff Library. I want to especially recognize the very fine government documents section there

-ix-

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Spurious Issues: Race and Multiracial Identity Politics in the United States
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • A Note About Electronic Sources xiii
  • Acronyms xv
  • Introduction 1
  • Notes 10
  • 1 - The American Racial Paradigm 13
  • Notes 49
  • 2 - Federal Racial Categorization 55
  • Notes 82
  • 3 - Multiracial Identity 87
  • Notes 119
  • 4 - The Multiracial Category Initiative 125
  • Notes 160
  • 5 - Final Proposal, Final Recommendation, Final Decision 167
  • Notes 185
  • 6 - Thinking About Transcending Race 189
  • Notes 198
  • Bibliography 201
  • Index 213
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