Natural Resource Management: The Human Dimension

By Alan W. Ewert | Go to book overview

6
Human Dimensions in Silviculture

Mark W. Brunson

Professional foresters are stewards, safeguarding not only the forests themselves but also a dynamic relationship between forests and society. That relationship has grown more complex as Americans demand an ever-broader array of products and services from their forests. It is increasingly difficult for foresters to satisfy society's diverse needs, especially when the same forests must supply amenities such as recreation or scenery as well as logs and other commodities. Foresters seeking to reduce commodity/amenity value conflicts in a multi-resource forest must design timber production activities so that amenity values are protected as much as possible. To do so requires knowledge about the features of managed forests that influence their acceptability for amenity uses, and also about public attitudes toward forestry practices in general. This knowledge falls into the general category of "human dimensions in silviculture."

Silviculture has been variously defined as an art, a science, or an application of science. The pioneering forestry educator James Toumey described silviculture quite narrowly as "that branch of forestry which deals with the establishment, development, care, and reproduction of stands of timber. Its aim is the continuous production of wood" ( Tourney and Korstian 1947:2). Toumey's focus on wood is no longer sufficient, in an era when forests are also expected to provide highquality water, wildlife habitat, scenic beauty, recreation settings, niches for endangered plants, livestock forage, places for spiritual contemplation, and more. Silviculturists today strive to control "the establishment, growth, composition, and quality of forest vegetation ... in any given forest cover and locality [for] clearly defined management objective" ( Daniel et al. 1979:7).

Even so, most silvicultural activity has focused on the timber resource, often to the detriment of other resources such as wildlife or scenery. Only recently has

-91-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Natural Resource Management: The Human Dimension
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 265

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.