Smart Moves: 140 Checklists to Bring out the Best in You and Your Team

By Sam Deep; Lyle Sussman | Go to book overview

14. Manage Your Boss

CARTOONS are a powerful communication medium. Through their humor they point out the foibles, hypocrisies, pet peeves, and pretensions we all recognize but are reluctant to discuss. They represent "society's ombudsman" -- a safe way to air the grievances we would otherwise conceal.

Scan a sample of popular magazines or daily newspapers and you'll see a significant portion of cartoons dealing with boss-subordinate relationships. It would appear as if American cartoonists are allowing us to vent our frustration with our bosses through laughter -- a release far safer than one which many of us may fantasize about.

The reason why frustration with bosses is such a "hot topic" for cartoonists is easily understood. Aside from your parents and your spouse, there is probably no other adult relationship with the potential to make your day-to-day life a living heaven or a living hell.

Who is the most important person in determining your upward mobility? Your boss. Who has control over your raises and bonuses? Your boss. Who has direct authority in assigning you jobs that enhance your skills and selfesteem versus those that dehumanize you into a robot? Your boss. What is a major potential cause of psychosomatic illnesses? Your boss.

On a day-to-day basis your boss has direct control over your career and your earning power, and thus indirect ef-

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Smart Moves: 140 Checklists to Bring out the Best in You and Your Team
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Contents iii
  • Acknowledgments xii
  • Preface xiii
  • Four Ways to Use This Book xv
  • 1. Communicate Successfully 1
  • 2. Deliver Powerful Presentations 22
  • 3. Write for Results 54
  • 4. Supervise Assertively 71
  • 5. Create Quality 89
  • 6. Run Effective Meetings 105
  • 7. Manage Conflict Productively 120
  • 8. Negotiate to Win 136
  • 9. Conduct Successful Interviews 147
  • 10. Develop Your Organization 165
  • 11. Plan and Problem Solve 191
  • 12. Find More Time in Your Day 204
  • 13. Achieve Personal Success 214
  • 14. Manage Your Boss 231
  • Action Index 243
  • About the Authors 245
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