Moscow DMZ: The Story of the International Effort to Convert Russian Weapons Science to Peaceful Purposes

By Glenn E. Schweitzer | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

A Salute to the Contributions of Many Others

Samuel Johnson said, "Your manuscript is both good and original; but the parts that are good are not original, and the parts that are original are not good." I suspect that the reader of this book will find considerable truth in his admonition, for many of the most interesting insights in this book are the insights of others.

Many Russian colleagues throughout their country deserve my special thanks for their never-ending efforts to help me understand what was happening within a society in transition -- within the government, within financial circles, within all types of technical institutions, and within Russian families. From them I learned that generalities about Russian attitudes and motivations require many caveats. I learned that there is no one more resourceful than a Russian in coping with the unexpected. And I learned that a Russian friend will be there when you need him.

The leaders of the Ministry of Atomic Energy, the Russian Academy of Sciences, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, and other governmental and scientific organizations repeatedly went out of their way to help ensure a professionally rewarding and personally satisfying stay for my wife and me in Moscow. If they viewed my activities at highly classified Russian facilities as suspicious, they never conveyed such an impression to me; and I can assure them that I never violated their trust. They were always ready to entertain any question I had. Invariably I received a frank and prompt answer, even though the answer was not always the one I wanted to hear. What a difference a few years can make!

The International Science and Technology Center (ISTC) staff from the United States, Europe, Japan, and Russia displayed a level of loyalty and support for our collective efforts that rivaled my best experiences during a career of several decades as a manager of technical and policy programs in the United States. In many ways, I regretted the day

-vii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Moscow DMZ: The Story of the International Effort to Convert Russian Weapons Science to Peaceful Purposes
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 291

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.