Political Culture and Constitutionalism: A Comparative Approach

By Daniel P. Franklin; Michael J. Baun | Go to book overview

1

Political Culture and
Constitutionalism in Britain

William B. Gwyn

Political development in Britain has been largely endogenous, and change has been slow and piecemeal rather than abrupt and radical. The English have lived continuously under some form of representative government since the close of the thirteenth century, and the Scots almost as long. Unlike many other countries in the world today that have experienced conquest and often colonization by other powers during the past two centuries, England has not been conquered or dominated by another state since 1066. Nor has there been a successful internal rebellion since 1688, and that one was aimed at preserving and extending the existing constitutional system. The absence of external conquest and internal revolution, as well as a cautious and pragmatic attitude toward institutional innovation, has meant that, while the character of representative government in Britain has changed immensely over the course of the past three hundred years, change has taken place gradually. The result of this type of institutional change has been that many people have been unaware of its taking place, and concern about it has therefore been minimal. It has also meant that some of the most important innovations in the British constitution cannot be dated with precision.


Political Culture and the Structure of Politics

Since the eighteenth century, commentators on Britain have stressed that its political elites and the population generally tend to take a cautious, pragmatic, undogmatic, untheoretical, and incremental approach toward problem solving. Visiting England in 1835, Alexis de Tocqueville observed:

The spirit of English legislation is an incomprehensible mixture of the spirits of innovation and routine, which perfects the details of laws without noticing

-13-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Political Culture and Constitutionalism: A Comparative Approach
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 246

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.