The Gogo: History, Customs, and Traditions

By Mathias E. Mnyampala; Gregory H. Maddox | Go to book overview

Part 2

History of Manyoni

Chapter 27. The Kilimatinde Fort Moves to Manyoni

We begin by relating the story of the move of the Kilimatinde government post, or boma, to Manyoni. After the great famine called Mtunya, the English government, which had begun to rule the country of Tanganyika, decided to move the Kilimatinde boma to Manyoni, where there was a railway station with more water. These plans were made in 1922. The building of the boma at Manyoni then began. In 1923 the boma moved from Kilimatinde to Manyoni, when R.E. Seymon was the administrative officer.

At this time Native Authorities had not been created, and the country around Kiwere had not been given to Tabora District. Kilimatinde has remained a Native Authority market, with Indian shops and even more Arab shops. It is also the location of a CMS [ Church Missionary Society] 93 school and hospital. This is the way Kilimatinde boma moved to Manyoni and remained there until now.

-85-

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The Gogo: History, Customs, and Traditions
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Foreword xi
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • Introduction: The - Ironies of Historia, Mila Na Desturi Za Wagogo 1
  • A Note on the Translation 35
  • Introduction 39
  • Part 1 - History of Dodoma 41
  • Part 2 - History of Manyoni 85
  • Part 3 - Customs and Traditions 97
  • In Praise of Dodoma (inasifika Dodoma) 123
  • Notes 127
  • Glossary 139
  • Bibliography 141
  • Index 145
  • About the Authors 151
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