Writings of John Quincy Adams - Vol. 7

By John Quincy Adams; Worthington Chauncey Ford | Go to book overview

TO DON FRANCISCO DIONISIO VIVÉS1

DEPARTMENT OF STATE,
WASHINGTON, May 8, 1820.

SIR:

In the letter which I had the honor of writing to you on the 3d instant, it was observed that all reference would readily be waived to the delays which have retarded the ratification by his Catholic Majesty of the treaty of the 22d February, 1819, and all disquisition upon the perfect right of the United States to that ratification, in the confident expectation that it would be immediately given upon the arrival of your messenger at Madrid, and subject to your compliance with the proposal offered you in the same note, as the last proof which the President could give of his reliance upon the termination of the differences between the United States and Spain by the ratification of that treaty.

This proposal was, that, upon the explanations given you on all the points noticed in your instructions, and with which you had admitted yourself to be personally satisfied, you

____________________
went to Congress on the 9th. Messages and Papers of the Presidents, II. 71; Adams, Memoirs, May 6-9, 1820.

Poletica had intimated to Nesselrode in February, 1870, that the Missouri question would interfere with a settlement of the Florida question, and added: "Il est malheureux pour Monsieur Adams d'y compter des ennemis trés influents dans les deux Chambres [of Congress] et d'avoir en même temps à se garder des antagonistes même dans le Cabinet. Depuis quelque temps Monsieur Adams parait fort à battre et plus réservé que jamais: personne ne doute que ses chances pour arriver un jour à la Présidence ne soient presque entiérement détruites. On s'attend même à le voir déplacé après la réelection du Président actuel l'année prochaine. Dans ce cas le serai du nombre de ceux qui auront quelques raisons de le regretter. Mes relations personelles avec ce Ministre continuent à être très amicales: mais depuis la réunion du Congrès elles sont devenues très rares."

1
Printed in American State Papers, Foreign Relations, IV. 685.

-15-

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Writings of John Quincy Adams - Vol. 7
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • To the President 1
  • Paper Submitted to the President 2
  • Paper Submitted to the President 5
  • Paper Submitted to the President 8
  • To Don Francisco Dionisio Vivés1 15
  • To Don Francisco Dionisio Vivés 28
  • To John Forsyth 29
  • To John Howard March 32
  • To Albert Gallatin 33
  • To Albert Gallatin 34
  • To Josiah Quincy 36
  • To Henry Middleton 37
  • To Don Francisco Dionisio Vivés 40
  • To the President [james Monroe] 43
  • To Henry Middleton 46
  • To Jonathan Jennings 52
  • To Jonathan Jennings 54
  • To Jonathan Jennings 56
  • To Jonathan Jennings 57
  • To the President 59
  • To the President [james Monroe] 61
  • To Albert Gallatin 64
  • To Albert Gallatin 66
  • To Albert Gallatin 68
  • To Albert Gallatin 71
  • To Albert Gallatin 73
  • To Albert Gallatin 75
  • To Henry Middleton 82
  • To Stratford Canning 84
  • To George Sullivan 88
  • To Richard Rush 92
  • To Don Francisco Dionisio Vives 94
  • To Albert Gallatin 97
  • To Richard Peters 100
  • To Richard Peters 101
  • To the Earl of Carysfoot 105
  • To Hyde De Neuville 107
  • To the President 111
  • To Robert Walsh, Jr. 113
  • To the President 118
  • To the President 119
  • To the President 123
  • To the President 126
  • To the President 127
  • To the President 160
  • To the President 164
  • To the President 165
  • To Louisa Catherine Adams 170
  • To Stratford Canning 171
  • To Stratford Canning 176
  • To, Daniel Brent 178
  • To Daniel Brent 179
  • To Don Francisco Dionisio Vivés 180
  • To Robert Walsh, Jr. 182
  • To Robert Walsh, Jr. 183
  • To Robert Walsh, Jr. 189
  • To Robert Walsh, Jr. 190
  • To Robert Walsh, Jr. 191
  • To Henry Alexander Scammell Dearborn 196
  • To Edward Everett 197
  • To Joel Lewis 208
  • To Baron Hyde De Neuville 210
  • To Baron Hyde De Neuville 212
  • To Pierre De Poletica 214
  • To Don Joaquin De Anduaga 216
  • To Don Joaquin De Anduaga 245
  • To the Chevalier Amado Grehon 247
  • To Robert Walsh 250
  • To Robert Walsh 252
  • To Joseph Hopkinson 255
  • To Robert Walsh 256
  • To Charles Jared Ingersoll 261
  • To Robert Walsh 266
  • To Robert Walsh 270
  • To Robert Walsh 281
  • To Robert Walsh 283
  • To Louisa Catherine Adams 285
  • To Louisa Catherine Adams 286
  • To Louisa Catherine Adams 288
  • To Louisa Catherine Adams 289
  • To Louisa Catherine Adams 292
  • To Louisa Catherine Adams 294
  • To Louisa Catherine Adams 296
  • To Louisa Catherine Adams 297
  • To Louisa Catherine Adams 299
  • To Louisa Catherine Adams 301
  • To Albert Gallatin 303
  • To Louisa Catherine Adams 304
  • To Louisa Catherine Adams 305
  • To John Adams 307
  • To Louisa Catherine Adams 308
  • To James Lloyd 310
  • To James Lloyd 313
  • To James Lloyd 314
  • To James Lloyd 315
  • To George Mifflin Dallas 319
  • To Robert Walsh 320
  • To Stratford Canning 323
  • To Robert Walsh 330
  • To the Editors of the National Intelligencer 334
  • To the Freeholders of Washington, Wythe, Grayson, Russell, Tazewell, Lee and Scott Counties, Virginia 335
  • To the Freeholders of Washington, Wythe, Grayson, Russell, Tazewell, Lee and Scott Counties, Virginia 354
  • To the Freeholders of Washington, Wythe, Grayson, Russell, Tazewell, Lee and Scott Counties, Virginia 356
  • To Stephen Row Bradley 363
  • To Rufus King 366
  • To Rufus King 366
  • To Rufus King 367
  • To Rufus King 421
  • To Rufus King 422
  • To Rufus King 423
  • To Rufus King 441
  • To Charles Jared Ingersoll 487
  • To Richard Rush 498
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