Writings of John Quincy Adams - Vol. 7

By John Quincy Adams; Worthington Chauncey Ford | Go to book overview

tions could justify reprisals of any kind, by the latter against the United States. And as I have assured you that they desire no exclusive favors to the detriment of others, so they are fully persuaded that upon further advisement your government will perceive that they cannot grant commercial favors to any other nation to the detriment of the United States, without injuring their own subjects more than the people of this Union. Such it is believed would be the result of any experiment of reprisals by granting exclusive favors to one nation, with the view to damage another. The party granting exclusive favors is the party most severely punished.

Far more agreeable will it be to the government of the United States to reciprocate as heretofore with that of Portugal, offices of kindness and good will, and to promote the friendly intercourse between the two nations, by a multiplication of good offices, and of all the sources by which the interests of both may be advanced.

I pray you, etc.


TO ROBERT WALSH1

Private. WASHINGTON, 12 May, 1822.

DEAR SIR:

In the National Gazette of Friday the 10th instant is published a letter from Jonathan Russell to the Secretary of

____________________
1
The publication through Congress by Jonathan Russell, one of the United States commissioners to negotiate the treaty of Ghent in 1814, of a private dispatch prepared and sent by Russell to the Secretary of State from Paris, February 11, 1815, precipitated a controversy between Russell and Adams which put an end to the public career of the former. His intention in securing the publication was clearly to destroy any prospect Adams might have of the Presidency, and he wished to support the ambitions of Clay. Not finding the original dispatch in the Department of State, Russell used his rough draft, making some alterations in the language.

-250-

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Writings of John Quincy Adams - Vol. 7
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • To the President 1
  • Paper Submitted to the President 2
  • Paper Submitted to the President 5
  • Paper Submitted to the President 8
  • To Don Francisco Dionisio Vivés1 15
  • To Don Francisco Dionisio Vivés 28
  • To John Forsyth 29
  • To John Howard March 32
  • To Albert Gallatin 33
  • To Albert Gallatin 34
  • To Josiah Quincy 36
  • To Henry Middleton 37
  • To Don Francisco Dionisio Vivés 40
  • To the President [james Monroe] 43
  • To Henry Middleton 46
  • To Jonathan Jennings 52
  • To Jonathan Jennings 54
  • To Jonathan Jennings 56
  • To Jonathan Jennings 57
  • To the President 59
  • To the President [james Monroe] 61
  • To Albert Gallatin 64
  • To Albert Gallatin 66
  • To Albert Gallatin 68
  • To Albert Gallatin 71
  • To Albert Gallatin 73
  • To Albert Gallatin 75
  • To Henry Middleton 82
  • To Stratford Canning 84
  • To George Sullivan 88
  • To Richard Rush 92
  • To Don Francisco Dionisio Vives 94
  • To Albert Gallatin 97
  • To Richard Peters 100
  • To Richard Peters 101
  • To the Earl of Carysfoot 105
  • To Hyde De Neuville 107
  • To the President 111
  • To Robert Walsh, Jr. 113
  • To the President 118
  • To the President 119
  • To the President 123
  • To the President 126
  • To the President 127
  • To the President 160
  • To the President 164
  • To the President 165
  • To Louisa Catherine Adams 170
  • To Stratford Canning 171
  • To Stratford Canning 176
  • To, Daniel Brent 178
  • To Daniel Brent 179
  • To Don Francisco Dionisio Vivés 180
  • To Robert Walsh, Jr. 182
  • To Robert Walsh, Jr. 183
  • To Robert Walsh, Jr. 189
  • To Robert Walsh, Jr. 190
  • To Robert Walsh, Jr. 191
  • To Henry Alexander Scammell Dearborn 196
  • To Edward Everett 197
  • To Joel Lewis 208
  • To Baron Hyde De Neuville 210
  • To Baron Hyde De Neuville 212
  • To Pierre De Poletica 214
  • To Don Joaquin De Anduaga 216
  • To Don Joaquin De Anduaga 245
  • To the Chevalier Amado Grehon 247
  • To Robert Walsh 250
  • To Robert Walsh 252
  • To Joseph Hopkinson 255
  • To Robert Walsh 256
  • To Charles Jared Ingersoll 261
  • To Robert Walsh 266
  • To Robert Walsh 270
  • To Robert Walsh 281
  • To Robert Walsh 283
  • To Louisa Catherine Adams 285
  • To Louisa Catherine Adams 286
  • To Louisa Catherine Adams 288
  • To Louisa Catherine Adams 289
  • To Louisa Catherine Adams 292
  • To Louisa Catherine Adams 294
  • To Louisa Catherine Adams 296
  • To Louisa Catherine Adams 297
  • To Louisa Catherine Adams 299
  • To Louisa Catherine Adams 301
  • To Albert Gallatin 303
  • To Louisa Catherine Adams 304
  • To Louisa Catherine Adams 305
  • To John Adams 307
  • To Louisa Catherine Adams 308
  • To James Lloyd 310
  • To James Lloyd 313
  • To James Lloyd 314
  • To James Lloyd 315
  • To George Mifflin Dallas 319
  • To Robert Walsh 320
  • To Stratford Canning 323
  • To Robert Walsh 330
  • To the Editors of the National Intelligencer 334
  • To the Freeholders of Washington, Wythe, Grayson, Russell, Tazewell, Lee and Scott Counties, Virginia 335
  • To the Freeholders of Washington, Wythe, Grayson, Russell, Tazewell, Lee and Scott Counties, Virginia 354
  • To the Freeholders of Washington, Wythe, Grayson, Russell, Tazewell, Lee and Scott Counties, Virginia 356
  • To Stephen Row Bradley 363
  • To Rufus King 366
  • To Rufus King 366
  • To Rufus King 367
  • To Rufus King 421
  • To Rufus King 422
  • To Rufus King 423
  • To Rufus King 441
  • To Charles Jared Ingersoll 487
  • To Richard Rush 498
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