Not to People like Us: Hidden Abuse in Upscale Marriages

By Susan Weitzman | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

The effort of researching, analyzing, and writing a book has many phases. Some are arduous, some are simple, and all have an impact on the final form. Thankfully, I have had support and guidance from several wonderful people throughout all the phases of this major accomplishment in my life; without their efforts, input, and help, that effort would probably not have resulted in this book. I am pleased to take this opportunity to acknowledge these people.

First and foremost, I want to express my thanks to and respect for the women of the study who so earnestly and honestly gave of themselves in the most expansive ways as they told their stories. Their courage, candor, warmth, and strong survival skills ultimately were the background, foreground, and essence of this work. I would never have found these women had it not been for the kind and generous efforts of attorney Mel Sloan and his secretary, Ellen Phelps. Going beyond the call of duty, they were key in helping me gather my study sample, giving their time and energy. Attorney Stephen Schlegel was also helpful at an early stage. My transcriptionist, Natalie Hector, displayed amazing fortitude and perseverance as she pored over the interview tapes (at times painful to listen to and transcribe owing to the nature of the content), getting them back to me quickly and with extremely kind and compassionate reactions.

Dr. Daniel Lee and Dr. Judith Wittner helped me begin and then pursue my qualitative research, consistently offering support, relevant references, and thoughts and ideas. Their early faith in my research on this topic served as mighty fertilizer for its growth, as well as for my own growth.

Dr. Joseph Walsh, adviser, mentor, friend, and colleague, was an advocate of my work from its inception. His belief in its importance was a beacon of light for me, as were the insights he so readily gave me through every step of my study and beyond. Always there to take a call and to keep me on track, Joe was patient, thoughtful, and wise, and offered a sense of order at times and in

-v-

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