Academia in Upheaval: Origins, Transfers, and Transformations of the Communist Academic Regime in Russia and East Central Europe

By Michael David-Fox; György Péteri | Go to book overview

Thus, years after the collapse of the Soviet Union, Russia remains saddled with a system of scientific research that is more similar to its Soviet predecessor than perhaps any other aspect of Russian society.


NOTES
1.
The phrase "dramatic political interference in academia" is taken from the announcement mailed out to participants in the "Wissenschaft und Macht" forum held in Halle, Germany, May 15-17, 1996, where an earlier version of this chapter was presented. I would like to express my appreciation to Wolfgang Arnold and Manfred Heinemann for arranging that conference.
2.
See Chapter 3 in Loren R. Graham, What Have We Learned About Science from the Russian Experience? ( Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1998).
3.
An enormous literature exists on these subjects. A few examples are Kendall Bailes, Technology and Society under Lenin and Stalin ( Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1978); Loren R. Graham, The Soviet Academy of Sciences and the Communist Party, 1927-1932 ( Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1967); David Joravsky, The Lysenko Affair ( Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1970); Zhores Medvedev, The Rise and Fall of T. D. Lysenko ( New York: Columbia University Press, 1969); Mark Azbel, Refusenik: Trapped in the Soviet Union ( Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1981); Mark Popovsky, Manipulated Science ( Garden City, N.Y.: Doubleday, 1979); and M. G. Iaroshevskii, ed. Repressirovannaia nauka ( Leningrad: Nauka, Leningradskoe Otdelienie, 1991).
4.
Graham, The Soviet Academy of Sciences and the Communist Party; Aleksey E. Levin, "Expedient Catastrophe: A Reconsideration of the 1929 Crisis at the Soviet Academy of Science," Slavic Review 47, no. 2 ( 1988): 261-279.
5.
James T. Andrews, Science and Technology for the Masses: The Bolshevik State, Public Science, and the Popular Imagination ( Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press, forthcoming), and conversation and correspondence with the author.
6.
M. Iu. Sorokina, "'Molchat' dalee nel'zia . . .' (Iz epistoliarnogo naslediia akademika S. F. Ol'denburga)," Voprosy istorii estestvoznaniia i tekhniki, no. 3 ( 1995): 110.
7.
Alexander Vucinich, Empire of Knowledge: The Academy of Sciences of the USSR ( 1917-1970) ( Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press, 1984).
8.
Jeremy R. Azrael, Managerial Power and Soviet Politics ( Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1966), 29-30. Also see Bailes, Technology and Society under Lenin and Stalin.
9.
Hilde Hardeman, Coming to Terms with the Soviet Regime: The "Changing Signposts" Movement among the Russian Emigration in the Early 1920s ( DeKalb: Northern Illinois University Press, 1994).
10.
Alexandra Kollontai and V. Pletnev were very critical of scientists and engineers. See the discussion "The Great Debate over Technical Specialists,"

-272-

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