Social Work: Search for Identity

By Leslie Leighninger | Go to book overview

Bibliographical Note

The two most useful collections for the study of social work's professional development after 1920 are the records of the National Association of Social Workers and of the Council on Social Work Education, both located in the Social Welfare History Archives, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota. The NASW Records are a well-organized collection documenting the development of the NASW's major predecessor, the American Association of Social Workers. AASW records include minutes and correspondence of the Executive, Membership, Government and Social Work, and other committees, proceedings of most of the annual meetings and delegate conferences, and reports on grievance cases. There is one important gap in the AASW records--the minutes of the Executive Committee from 1931 through 1934. Otherwise, this is a comprehensive collection, which also includes the records of the five other professional organizations ( AAGW, AAMSW, APSW, NASSW, and SWRG) which helped form the NASW in 1955, the papers of the American Association for the Study of Community organization, the records of the Temporary Inter-Association Council, which engineered the NASW's formation, and NASW papers for the period 1955 to 1969.

The Council on Social Work Education Records are extensive, but less well-organized at present. They include the documents of the American Association of Schools of Social Work: Executive Committee minutes and correspondence, proceedings from some annual meetings, and the reports and records of various committees. The AASW Records in the CSWE collection can be supplemented by material on the association in the Grace Browning/Mary Houk Papers at the Social Welfare History Archives. The CSWE collection also includes the records of the council from 1952 to 1975. Several other collections at the Social Welfare History Archives deal with the history of social work education. The records of the Study of Social Work Education contain important material on Ernest Hollis and Alice Taylor's 1951 study, Social Work Education in the United States. The papers of Mattie Cal Maxted are extremely valuable in presenting a picture of the development of the National Association of Schools of Social Administration in the 1940s. The Maxted Papers include a good deal of correspondence among NASSA leaders, as well as letters and reports from the Joint Accrediting Committee of state universities and land grant colleges.

The NASW and CSWE records were valuable resources for the

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