Second Language Acquisition and the Critical Period Hypothesis

By David Birdsong | Go to book overview

PREFACE

In August 1996, a number of researchers converged on Jyväskylä, Finland, to participate in an Association Internationale de Linguistique Appliquée (AILA) symposium entitled "New Perspectives on the Critical Period for Second Language Acquisition". Under this banner, the participants took aim at the question of whether, or to what extent, a critical period limits the acquisition of a first language as well as a second language acquired postpubertally. Attendance at the symposium, as well as discussion, was robust. So, too, was the enthusiasm to use the presentations as a nucleus for the present volume.

As major players in this debate, the participants were well aware that positions on this issue run the gamut from outright rejection to empassioned acceptance. It is a question that has been approached by researchers working in linguistic theory, evolution theory, language processing, and neurophysiology, to name but a few of the relevant disciplines. The Critical Period Hypothesis for Second Language Acquisition (CPH-L2A) has spawned an abundance of data, ranging from grammaticality judgments to speech samples to Event-Related Brain Potentials. These data have lent themselves to interpretation in many ways: for example, as consistent with theories of access (or lack of access) to Universal Grammar; as suggesting post-maturational age effects and cross-linguisic (transfer) effects; and as evidence for the tremendous diversity of learner outcomes, ranging from little progress to nativelike mastery.

This diversity is represented in this volume. In addition, I have sought inquiry that cuts across several sub-disciplines of linguistics -- phonetics, phonology, lexis, syntax, morphology -- and that embraces modern sciences with such prefixes as psycho- and neuro- . I have aimed for an informative mixture of theory, evidence, and cautious argumentation. Finally, the contributions to the book are equally divided between the pro-CPH-L2A and the anti-CPH-L2A positions.

In these respects this book sets itself apart from other treatments of the CPH-L2A. By its breadth of inquiry, the volume should appeal to a

-ix-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Second Language Acquisition and the Critical Period Hypothesis
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 191

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.