Social Aspects of Industry: A Survey of Labor Problems and Causes of Industrial Unrest

By S. Howard Patterson | Go to book overview

CHAPTER III
THE BACKGROUND IN POPULATION

IMMIGRATION AND THE SUPPLY OF LABOR

1. Increase and Distribution of the Population of the United States . The phenomenal increase in the population of the United States has been accomplished by both immigration and a natural surplus of births over deaths in the native population. Although territorial expansion has accompanied this increase of population, there is a serious problem of congestion in the older industrial sections of our country.

When independence was achieved the total population of the original thirteen states numbered a scant 3,000,000. At the present time the population of continental United States is well over 110,000,000. It would seem that our population has doubled within every generation of 25 or 30 years. The census figures are as follows.


POPULATION INCREASES IN THE UNITED STATES
17903,929,214 186031,443,321
18005,308,483 187038,558,371
18107,239,881 188050,155,783
18209,638,453 189062,947,714
183012,866,020 190075,994,575
184017,069,453 191091,972,266
185023,191,876 1920105,710,620
1928120,013,0001
The Federal Census Bureau's estimate, July 1, 1928.

As compared with Europe and Asia, America is still sparsely populated. Before the World War, for illustration, Germany was ten times as densely populated as the United States. The average density of population for this country, as a whole, is slightly over 30 people per square mile. The center of population has moved gradually westward through Maryland, West Virginia, and Indiana.

The average density of population, however, is as misleading as the average length of life. Portions of our great West are very sparsely settled, for the immigrant tide tends to congest in our eastern and central industrial states. At the present time a trifle over half our entire population live in cities of 2,500 or more. Indeed, more than 5 per cent of all the people of the United States reside within greater New York City.

2. Composition of Our Population . -- About nine-tenths of the population of the United States are Caucasions. The census for 1920 showed

-45-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Social Aspects of Industry: A Survey of Labor Problems and Causes of Industrial Unrest
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 539

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.