NOTES
I. i. 1. In the two opening speeches there is plainly a historical allusion; and probably to contemporary events. I incline to think that the reference may be to the assassination of Concini, Maréchal d'Ancre, by order of the young king, Louis XIII. Concini, the favourite of the queen-mother, was bitterly hated; and his murder was skilfully represented as an act of justice against a public enemy and a traitor. Luines, who advised the king in the matter and succeeded to the power of Concini, made a parade of calling the old councillors of Henry IV.--'les vieux serviteurs du feu roi son père'--back to court. (See Martin, Histoire de France, t. xi. pp. 112121.)

If this suggestion be well founded--but it is offered with great diffidence--we should be able to fix the date of the Play more closely, to 1617-18. Concini was assassinated in April 1617; and, for the reason stated in the Preface, the Play must have been written by the end of the following year.

I. i. 10. Which, i.e. his palace.
I. i. 23. What they ought to foresee. A contrast seems to be intended between telling a prince what he ought to do and giving him such information as shall enable him to form his own judgment on the case.
I. i. 37. I wore two towels: like Falstaff's regiment, 1 Henry IV., IV. ii. 48.
I. i. 41. Dog-days. Days of ill-luck, which the rising of the dog- star was supposed to signify. Browne, Vulgar Errors, iv. 13.
I. i. 61. Nor ever died any man. The Quarto reads 'did,' but it is clearly a misprint. In the same sentence the Quarto reads 'he

-146-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Duchess of Malfi
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Preface v
  • Dramatis Personæ xviii
  • Notes 146
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 160

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.