Social Aspects of Industry: A Survey of Labor Problems and Causes of Industrial Unrest

By S. Howard Patterson | Go to book overview

CHAPTER IX
THE LONG DAY AND THE PROBLEM OF INDUSTRIAL FATIGUE

INCREASED LEISURE AND IMPROVED WORKING CONDITIONS

1. Human Conservation. -- Excessive hours of labor represent a form of industrial exploitation which is not confined only to women and children, but which also involves a large portion of our adult male workers. Human conservation requires a restriction of the hours of all laborers and an improvement of working conditions in all kinds of employment.

In Chap. VII was discussed the inadequacy of the wages of many adult male workers to maintain a decent standard of living for their families. It is also true that the hours of labor are often the longest and the conditions of work the most fatiguing among those labor groups which suffer the most from inadequate wages. Human conservation involves not only a living wage but also the reduction of the long working day and the improvement of general conditions of employment. The quantitative side of human conservation is that of fewer hours of work, and its qualitative side is that of a reduction of the strains, discomforts, and hazards of modern industry.

The invention of power machinery has made it possible to increase output and to decrease the hours of work. Modern technology has not only increased our national prosperity, but it has also offered the possibility of increased leisure. These gains of the Industrial Revolution, however, were not realized immediately by the workers in the form of higher standards of living and shorter hours of work. It was not until after the development of effective collective bargaining that labor organizations began to attack successfully the evils of subnormal standards of living and excessive hours of work.

The modern increase of power machinery, the introduction of new processes, and the spread of scientific management have increased still further our industrial productivity, so that more wealth than formerly can now be produced in a still shorter time. Although modern industry is characterized by new hazards, greater monotony, and increased strain, it also offers the possibility of higher wages and shorter hours. Hence, a study of industrial efficiency must be supplemented by a consideration of these various problems of human conservation. Industry exists for man and not man for industry.

Increased productivity must be accompanied by shorter hours of work, as well as by increased wages. Under the lure of piece work and

-226-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Social Aspects of Industry: A Survey of Labor Problems and Causes of Industrial Unrest
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 539

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.