An Introduction to the Methods and Materials of Literary Criticism: The Bases in Aesthetics and Poetics

By Charles Mills Gayley; Fred Newton Scott | Go to book overview

CHAPTER VI.
THE HISTORICAL STUDY OF POETICS.

§ 21, B. The student should first familiarize himself with the poetics of Plato and Aristotle (see §§ 8, 9, and 20, above, and, for texts and translations of Aristotle's Poetics, the Appendix to, this volume), and especially with such treatises as Butcher's Theory of Poetry and Fine Arts and Bywater's Commentary on Aristotle's Poetics, which, soon to be issued from the Clarendon Press, promises to be of decided worth. The theories of Plotinus, Longinus, Quintilian, and Horace should also find a place in this preliminary study. The influence of Longinus, for instance, is obvious in productions as recent as Shaftesbury's Characteristics and Addison's Pleasures of the Imagination; of Horace's Ars Poetica, the long-continued vitality is in a general way known to every student. The special investigator will naturally desire to follow the course of poetic theory through the Latin treatises (particularly mediaeval and renaissance) devoted to that subject; and for him the following list is inserted. Other students may prefer to turn to the sections dealing with English, French, and German poetics.

An exhaustive list of LATIN TREATISES in modern times will be found in Friedrich von Blankenburg's Litterarische Zusätze zu Sulzer's Allgermeine Theorie der schönen Künste ( 3 vols. Leipz.: 1796-98, article "'Dichtkunst'"passim, from which much of the following enumeration is taken). Some of the more important authors are as follows: Johannes Garlandia, whose treatise, written in 1260, is of merely antiquarian interest; Dante, the second book of whose De Vulgari Elo

-380-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
An Introduction to the Methods and Materials of Literary Criticism: The Bases in Aesthetics and Poetics
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 590

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.