Workers and Utopia: A Study of Ideological Conflict in the American Labor Movement, 1865-1900

By Gerald N. Grob | Go to book overview

Bibliographical Essay

I. MANUSCRIPTS

Of greatest importance to the student of American labor history are the collection of Powderly manuscripts at the Department of Archives and Manuscripts, Catholic University of America, Washington, D. C., the John W. Hayes collection at the same repository, and the Samuel Gompers Letter Books at the A.F. of L.-C.I.O. Building, Washington, D. C. The A.F. of L.-C.I.O. is also in the process of microfilming many other documents pertaining to its affiliated unions, but it has unfortunately destroyed much of the incoming correspondence. The John Samuel Papers, Wisconsin State Historical Society, Madison, Wisconsin, and the Joseph Labadie Collection, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, are also revealing. Vaughn D. Bornet, "The New Labor History: A Challenge for American Historians," The Historian, XVIII (Autumn, 1955), 1-24, discusses the importance of manuscript materials for labor historians and also describes the holdings of the A.F. of L., but the author's description of the documents available is not always accurate.


II. THE LABOR PRESS *

A. General

For the labor movement of the 1860's Fincher's Trades' Review ( Philadelphia, 1863- 1866), the Workingman's Advocate ( Chicago, 1864- 1877), and the Daily Evening Voice ( Boston, 1865- 1867), are indispensable. The Revolution ( New York, 1868- 1872), and Woodhull & Claflin's Weekly ( New York, 1870- 1876) provides information about the relationship of women to the young labor movement. The Labor Standard ( New York, 1876- 1881) is useful for the depression of the 1870's and the attempts by labor to reorganize its broken forces. John Swinton's Paper ( New York, 1883- 1887) is undoubtedly one of the finest examples of labor journalism, as well as one of the most important sources of information for the mid-1880's. The Workmen's Advocate ( New Haven, Con

____________________
*
All dates given for the periodicals and proceedings cited in this section include only the issues consulted by the author (although in most cases complete files for the period were examined). More complete dates and places of publication can be found in Lloyd G. Reynolds and Charles C. Killingsworth, Trade Union Publications ( 3 vols: Baltimore, 1944- 1945); Bernard G. Naas and Carmelita S. Sakr, American Labor Union Periodicals: A Guide to Their Location ( Ithaca, New York, 1956); Winifred Gregory, Union List of Serials ( 2nd ed: New York, 1943).

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