Social Aspects of Industry: A Survey of Labor Problems and Causes of Industrial Unrest

By S. Howard Patterson | Go to book overview
or revolutionary unions. The significance of the Knights of Labor, a powerful labor union, is merely historical.The American Federation of Labor and the Industrial Workers of the World are the two important organizations of labor at the present time within the United States. The former is a trade union and the latter an industrial union. The former relies on the strike, the boycott, and other methods of collective bargaining, while the latter advocates the general strike and sabotage. The former accepts the present industrial system, but the latter seeks to overthrow modern capitalism.Although the American Federation of Labor numbers several millions, the larger portion of the workers of the country are unorganized. Illustrations are unskilled labor, clerical and professional group, agricultural workers, and women and children. Trade unionism made great progress in the United States during the World War, but it is still relatively and even absolutely less in numerical strength than in numerous European countries.The organization of the workers has been paralleled by the growing organization of employers. An illustration is the National Association of Manufacturers. They favor the open shop and oppose many of the practices of organized labor, such as the limitation of apprentices, the restriction of output, and the employment of "a walking delegate." Collective bargaining has assumed a militant form and each side has attempted to strengthen its economic position in the industrial conflict.
Collateral Reading
ADAMS T. S., and SUMNER H. L., "Labor Problems", chap. 7.
ATKINS W. E. and LASSWELL H. D., "Labor Attitudes and Problems", chaps. 17 and 24.
BLOOMFIELD D., "Modern Industrial Movements", pp. 35-87.
BLUM S., "Labor Economics", chaps. 13 and 14.
BRUERE R. W., "The Industrial Workers of the World", Harpers Magazine, July, 1918.
CARLTON F. T., "History and Problems of Organized Labor", chaps. 2 to 5, inc.
CATLIN W. B., "The Labor Problem", chaps. 9 and 10.
COMMONS J. R., Editor, "Trade Unionism and Labor Problems", see. ser., chaps. 25 to 28, inc.
ESTEY J. A., "The Labor Problem", chap. 2.
FAIRCHILD F. R., FURNISS E. S., and BUCK N. S., "Elementary Economics", vol. II chap. 53.
FITCH J. A., "Causes of industrial Unrest", chaps. 6 and 7.
FURNISS E. S., "Labor Problems", chaps. 8 and 9.
GOMPERS S., "Labor and the Employer", chaps. 1 and 2.
GROAT G. G., "organized Labor in America", chaps. 5 to 9, inc.
HAMILTON W. H., "Current Economic Problems", pp. 615-648 and 677-686.
HOXIE R. F., "Trade Urdonism in the United States", chaps. 4 to 8, inc.
PARKER C. H., "The Industrial Workers of the World", Atlantic Monthly, November, 1917.
TANNENBAUM F., "The Labor Movement", chaps. 9 to 12, inc.

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