Social Aspects of Industry: A Survey of Labor Problems and Causes of Industrial Unrest

By S. Howard Patterson | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XIV
AIMS AND POLICIES OF TRADE UNIONISM

THE ECONOMIC BASIS OF COLLECTIVE BARGAINING

1. Primary Objectives of Collective Bargaining. -- Collective bargaining is the answer of the organized workers to their real or fancied helplessness under the present wage system. The chief object of labor organizations is the raising of wages or the maintenance of customary standards of living against a rising price level. Closely associated with the objective of higher wages, however, is the desire of the workers for a shorter working day and increased leisure. Indeed, these two primary objectives of collective bargaining have often been merged into a single ideal. The following slogan of the American Federation of Labor is typical.

Whether you work by the piece or work by the day Decreasing the hours increases the pay.

The securing of these two primary objectives of collective bargaining is conditioned by the strength of organized labor. Hence, another primary aim of trade unionism is the maintenance of the right and the power of collective bargaining. Trade unions constantly seek to strengthen their own forces and weapons. They are bitterly opposed to any practices or restrictions which may sap the effectiveness of collective bargaining.

2. Secondary Functions of Labor Organizations. -- Trade unions are often mutual benefit associations which provide out of their accumulated dues for their disabled, bereaved, or unemployed members and families. Labor organizations sometimes maintain insurance programs of their own for the numerous hazards which their members face. Often they are affiliated with fraternal benefit associations. Labor organizations also frequently serve as employment bureaus for their members. They seek to find jobs for those out of work, and frequently maintain valuable records of the amount and causes of unemployment.

Some labor organizations perform important educational work. Periodicals are published, and numerous meetings are devoted to educational as well as to business programs. Thus, the garment workers maintain evening classes and even college courses for their members. Their annual almanac possesses artistic, literary, and educational merits, as well as a mere utilitarian purpose. The discussions in economics

-355-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Social Aspects of Industry: A Survey of Labor Problems and Causes of Industrial Unrest
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 539

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.