Social Aspects of Industry: A Survey of Labor Problems and Causes of Industrial Unrest

By S. Howard Patterson | Go to book overview
antiquity of human society and the comparative recency of certain great movements, such as the Industrial Revolution, one can obtain an intellectual perspective which makes for optimism. Although progress does not travel in a straight line, there is room for believing that economic progress is both cumulative and accelerated.It would seem that man's social adaptation has not kept pace with his physical adaptation. Economic progress is impeded by the presence of traditional methods of thought, by the absence of a strong social conscience, and by imperfectly developed agencies of social control.Maladjustments are those obstacles in the economic and social environment which hinder progress. They have been attacked by state legislation, by organized labor, and by socially minded employers. Progress may take the evolutionary method of attempting to eliminate certain economic maladjustments or the revolutionary method of seeking to remodel the entire industrial system.Economic progress is also conditioned by the biological factor of heredity. The advancement of the group can be achieved by the progressive elimination from society of certain degenerate strains. In addition to the improvement of the social and economic environment and the betterment of the physical heredity of the group, there still remains the factor of education in economic progress. It goes without saying that none of these methods of progress are mutually exclusive but rather that they are all necessary and interdependent.
Collateral Reading
ATKINS W. E. and LASSWELL H. D., "Labor Attitudes and Problems", chap. 27.
BYE R. T. and HEWETT W. W., "Applied Economies", Chap. 29
CARLIN W. B., "The Labor Problem", chap. 24.
CLEVELAND F. A., "Democracy and Reconstruction", chap. 15.
HAMILTON W. H., "Current Economic Problems", chap. 7.
HAYES E. C., "Introduction to the Study of Sociology", chap. 21.
KELSEY C., "The Physical Basis of Society", chaps. 3, 10, and 11.
KING W. L. M., "Industry and Humanity", chap. 12.
MARSHALL L. C., "Readings in Industrial Society", chap. 15.
NEARING S., "Social Adjustment", chaps. 15 and 17.
ROSS E. A., "Principles of Sociology", chaps. 34 and 35.
SEAGER H. R., "Principles of Economics", chap. 34.
WATKINS G. S., "Introduction to a Study of Labor Problems", chap. 27.

References
British Labor Party Reconstruction Program.
CHAMP F. S., "Social Evolution".
-----, "Cultural Charge".
CONKLIN E. G., "Heredity and Environment".
ELDRIDGE S., "Political Action, A Naturalistic Interpretation of the Labor Movement in Relation to the State".
HADLEYJ A. T., "Standards of Public Morality".

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