The Modern German Novel: A Mid-Twentieth Century Survey

By H. M. Waidson | Go to book overview

IX
THE LENGTH OF TIME

THE preoccupation with time and memory is a characteristic feature of much twentieth-century writing, and in this connection Hermann Broch ( 1886-1951) is, with his fellow-Austrian contemporaries Musil and Doderer, one of the most important writers in German in this analytical manner. Broch has indicated something of his approach to fiction in his account of the genesis of Die Schuldlosen ( 'The Innocent Ones', 1950), an epilogue where he explains the method of composition of the work and sums up what he considers to be the function of the novel form. The novel, he says, must depict a 'world totality', increasingly difficult though this is as the world becomes more complex and incoherent. This totality must not be on one plane only, since the novelist need not be limited by the naturalist convention, but should include the moral and metaphysical. Can the novel have a social purpose, he asks. Only the converted will be convinced, scepticism may say; but nevertheless the purpose of art is to be moral--it is to be 'Läuterung', purification, and Broch cites Goethe Faust. For Broch the most significant modern writer was James Joyce; he wrote an essay 'James Joyce und die Gegenwart' ( 'James Joyce and the Present', 1936) in honour of Joyce's fiftieth birthday, and in the epilogue to Die Schuldlosen he endowed Leopold Bloom with a representative significance extending well beyond the confines of Ulysses. Broch's search for totality of experience is expressed mainly on the social plane in the trilogy Die Schlafwandler ( 'The Sleepwalkers', 1931-2); Pasenow, the Prussian officer, finds in 1918 an affinity with the Social Democratic working man Esch through the common bond of their search for moral principles, but the friendship is destroyed by the unscrupulousness of Hugenau, the calculating materialist who is to

-90-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Modern German Novel: A Mid-Twentieth Century Survey
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Foreword vii
  • I - The Blurred Edges of Realism 1
  • II - Documentation 16
  • III - Past Time 33
  • IV - The Idyllic Ideal 42
  • V - Irony and Conviction 51
  • VI - 'the Golden Future Time' 62
  • VII - The Observers 72
  • VIII - Surrealism 78
  • IX - The Length of Time 90
  • X - Novel and Short Story 104
  • XI - Summing Up 115
  • Select Bibliography 120
  • List of Authors and Works 123
  • Index 129
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 134

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.