Interactive Oral History Interviewing

By Eva M. McMahan; Kim Lacy Rogers | Go to book overview

he or she has never exercised source monopoly, has attempted to continue the dialogue over the meaning of the testimony by bringing colleagues or the citizens themselves into the dialogue. The project is, thus, never finished. In his recent work, A Shared Authority ( 1989), Frisch presented us with a number of examples of how this was done and the effects on the historical consciousness of both the historians involved and the communities studied. Frisch's works serve to remind us of the public nature of our work. If the solution to the dilemmas of how we remain true to the best of the traditions of the profession while remaining true to the testimony we are given and the world from which it emerges is in some form of a dialogic approach, then it is incumbent upon us to always remind ourselves of the public nature of our work and its role in the larger social and political milieu in which we work.


REFERENCES

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Frisch M. ( 1979). Oral History and Hard Times: A review essay. Oral History Review, 53-69.

Frisch M. ( 1989). A shared authority: Essays in the craft and meaning of oral history and public history. Albany: State University of New York Press.

Gadamer H-G. ( 1976). Philosophical hermeneutics ( D. E. Linge, Trans.). Berkeley: University of California.

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Georges R. A., & Jones M. O. ( 1980). People studying people: The human element in fieldwork. Berkeley: University of California.

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Gluck S. B. ( 1987). Rosie the riveter revisited: Women, the war and social change. Boston, MA: Twayne.

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