Works of Fisher Ames: With a Selection from His Speeches and Correspondence - Vol. 1

By Fisher Ames; Seth Ames | Go to book overview

though we are ignorant of his opinion. 1 The majority, till the return of the absent of our side, will be small. All our State, and all New England (except Livermore, who is not violent and perhaps may concur with us will vote for the assumption. While the States discover more and more jealousy of the national government, it seems to be proper to secure it against the many dangers which threaten it, and the multitude of such as are now unforeseen and will arise when the present state of harmony shall be changed. Neglecting to do good will be doing evil. In any country, a public debt absolutely afloat, will produce agitation. How necessary then for us to act firmly and justly!


TO GEORGE RICHARDS MINOT.

New York, May 20,1790.

MY DEAR FRIEND,--It is a long time since I have heard from you. I wish to be assured by your own handwriting, that you have escaped the influenza, or if not, that you are well over it. The most dismal accounts of the prevailing sickness of the people in Boston have been given here. Our friend, Dr. Dexter, I am told has been very ill, and is but half recovered. I hope this is not true. You are going to be busy soon with the General Court, and after that kind of duty shall have begun, I shall despair of getting a word from you.

All my letters from our State assure me that Congress is becoming unpopular, and losing confidence as well as reputation. The impatience of the creditors to have their debt funded without delay has been mingled with the murmurs of the antis. I think I can see the policy of the latter, in forbear-

____________________
1
Mr. Ashe very soon put an end to all uncertainty on this point. Mr. Ames used to say that it was a very great convenience to himself that their names stood so near each other on the roll. He was always quite sure that he had voted right, if Mr. Ashe, who came next, voted the other way.

-77-

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Works of Fisher Ames: With a Selection from His Speeches and Correspondence - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Preface. iii
  • Contents of the First Volume. vii
  • Life. 1
  • Part I: Letters. 29
  • To George Richards Minot, Boston. 31
  • To George Richards Minot. 32
  • To George Richards Minot. 34
  • To George Richards Minot. 36
  • To George Richards Minot. 38
  • To George Richards Minot. 41
  • To George Richards Minot. 44
  • To George Richards Minot. 47
  • To Thomas Dwight. 50
  • To George Richards Minot. 52
  • To George Richards Minot. 53
  • To George Richards Minot. 57
  • To George Richards Minot. 61
  • To George Richards Minot. 65
  • To George Richards Minot. 66
  • To George Richards Minot. 71
  • To George Richards Minot. 72
  • To George Richards Minot. 75
  • To Thomas Dwight. 77
  • To George Richards Minot. 79
  • To Thomas Dwight. 83
  • To Thomas Dwight. 85
  • To Thomas Dwight. 88
  • To Thomas Dwight. 90
  • To Thomas Dwight. 91
  • To Thomas Dwight. 92
  • To George Richards Minot. 94
  • To Thomas Dwight. 95
  • To Thomas Dwight. 97
  • To Thomas Dwight. 99
  • To Thomas Dwight. 99
  • To George Richards Minot. 100
  • To Thomas Dwight. 102
  • To George Richards Minot. 108
  • To Thomas Dwight. 109
  • To Thomas Dwight. 110
  • To George Richards Minot. 111
  • To Thomas Dwight. 112
  • To George Richards Minot. 113
  • To Thomas Dwight. 114
  • To Thomas Dwight. 116
  • To George Richards Minot. 118
  • To Thomas Dwight. 119
  • To Thomas Dwight. 120
  • To George Richards Minot. 123
  • To Thomas Dwight. 124
  • To Thomas Dwight. 125
  • To Thomas Dwight. 126
  • To George Richards Minot. 127
  • To Thomas Dwight. 128
  • To George Richards Minot. 129
  • To Thomas Dwight. 130
  • To Christopher Gore. 132
  • To Christopher Gore. 135
  • To Christopher Gore. 137
  • To Christopher Gore. 139
  • To Thomas Dwight. 143
  • To Thomas Dwight. 144
  • To Thomas Dwight. 146
  • To Thomas Dwight. 149
  • To Christopher Gore. 152
  • To Thomas Dwight. 153
  • To Christopher Gore. 156
  • To Thomas Dwight. 158
  • To Christopher Gore. 161
  • To George Richards Minot. 164
  • To Christopher Gore. 167
  • To Thomas Dwight. 168
  • To Thomas Dwight. 169
  • To Thomas Dwight. 170
  • To Thomas Dwight. 173
  • To Thomas Dwight. 177
  • To Dwight Foster--(in Congress.) 177
  • To Jeremiah Smith. 183
  • To Thomas Dwight. 184
  • To Thomas Dwight. 185
  • To Thomas Dwight. 186
  • To Christopher Gore. 189
  • To Thomas Dwight. 192
  • To Thomas Dwight. 192
  • To Thomas Dwight. 193
  • To Christopher Gore. 194
  • To Thomas Dwight. 195
  • To Christopher Gore. 198
  • To Thomas Dwight. 204
  • To Christopher Gore. 205
  • To Thomas Dwight. 208
  • To Christopher Gore. 211
  • To Christopher Gore. 212
  • To Hon. Timothy Pickering. 215
  • To Dwight Foster. 218
  • To James Mchenry, Secretary of War. 219
  • To Christopher Gore. 220
  • To H. G. Otis. 222
  • To Timothy Pickering. 224
  • To Dwight Foster. 226
  • To Timothy Pickering. 231
  • To Christopher Gore. 232
  • To Thomas Dwight. 239
  • To Timothy Pickering. 240
  • To Thomas Dwight. 241
  • To Christopher Gore. 243
  • To Christopher Gore. 249
  • To Thomas Dwight. 252
  • To Christopher Gore. 255
  • To Timothy Pickering. 257
  • To Thomas Dwight. 259
  • To Christopher Gore. 260
  • To T. Pickering. 265
  • To Thomas Dwight. 269
  • To John Ward Fenno, Esq., Philadelphia. 274
  • To Christopher Gore. 277
  • To Alexander Hamilton. 278
  • To Thomas Dwight. 283
  • To Christopher Gore. 285
  • To Thomas Dwight. 286
  • To Jeremiah Smith. 290
  • To Theodore Dwight. 291
  • To Thomas Dwight. 292
  • To Thomas Dwight. 295
  • To Thomas Dwight. 296
  • To Christopher Gore. 297
  • To Christopher Gore. 298
  • To Christopher Gore. 309
  • To Jeremiah Smith. 313
  • To Dwight Foster. 317
  • To Christopher Gore. 322
  • To Thomas Dwight. 333
  • To Thomas Dwight. 336
  • To Thomas Dwight. 337
  • To Josiah Quincy. 338
  • To Thomas Dwight. 341
  • To Josiah Quincy. 345
  • To Josiah Quincy. 349
  • To Thomas Dwight. 350
  • To Timothy Pickering. 354
  • To Josiah Quincy. 357
  • To Josiah Quincy. 360
  • To Timothy Pickering. 361
  • To Timothy Pickering. 366
  • To Josiah Quincy. 368
  • To Timothy Pickering. 373
  • To Josiah Quincy. 376
  • To Josiah Quincy. 379
  • To Timothy Pickering. 380
  • To Josiah Quincy. 381
  • To Timothy Pickering. 383
  • To Josiah Quincy. 390
  • To Timothy Pickering. 392
  • To Josiah Quincy. 397
  • To Josiah Quincy. 398
  • To Josiah Quincy. 404
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