Works of Fisher Ames: With a Selection from His Speeches and Correspondence - Vol. 1

By Fisher Ames; Seth Ames | Go to book overview

Now, I am pretty confident of a better issue to this long contest. Conviction seems at last to have (won) its way to men, whose prejudices seemed to have barred up the passage. We hear no more about the injustice of the assumption; at last, it is tacitly allowed that it will promote justice; and it is asked, let it rest till the next session, and then we shall doubtless assume. This looks like coming over. Besides, consequences are feared. The New England States demand it as a debt of justice, with a tone so loud and threatening, that they fear the convulsions which would probably ensue. Further, they are going to fix the residence permanently on the Potomac, and by the apostasy of Pennsylvania will do it, removing, however, immediately to Philadelphia, and staying there ten years. Two such injuries would be too much. They dare not, I trust, carry Congress so far south, and leave the debts upon us. R. Morris, too, is really warm for the assumption, and as he is the factotum in the business, he will not fail to insist upon the original friends of it, and who have ever been a majority, voting for it. With five Pennsylvanians, our former aid from that delegation, we can carry it, or least obtain four fifths of the debts to be assumed. Accordingly, they begin to say, these violent feuds must be composed; too much is hazarded, to break up in this temper. Maryland is the most alarmed, as well as, next to Virginia, most anxious for the Potomac. I am beginning to be sanguine in the hope of success. 1 This week may decide. If so, the next will carry me to Springfield. But while such immense objects are depending, at the very crisis too, you will see that I cannot desert, without being chargeable with a breach of duty, and taking a risk of consequences and a weight of reproach I ought not to bear with my own consent. Please to give me your opinion upon these circumstances.

____________________
1
The proposition to assume the State debts failed at one time in the House; but on being revived, and connected with the proposition to remove the seat of government to Philadelphia, and after the expiration of ten years, to the Potomac, it prevailed by a very scanty majority. Mr. Jefferson says that this log-rolling connection of the two measures was arranged by an express agreement. Accordingly, two gentlemen, "with a revulsion of stomach almost convulsive," voted for the assumption; and this change of votes secured its passage.

-84-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Works of Fisher Ames: With a Selection from His Speeches and Correspondence - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Preface. iii
  • Contents of the First Volume. vii
  • Life. 1
  • Part I: Letters. 29
  • To George Richards Minot, Boston. 31
  • To George Richards Minot. 32
  • To George Richards Minot. 34
  • To George Richards Minot. 36
  • To George Richards Minot. 38
  • To George Richards Minot. 41
  • To George Richards Minot. 44
  • To George Richards Minot. 47
  • To Thomas Dwight. 50
  • To George Richards Minot. 52
  • To George Richards Minot. 53
  • To George Richards Minot. 57
  • To George Richards Minot. 61
  • To George Richards Minot. 65
  • To George Richards Minot. 66
  • To George Richards Minot. 71
  • To George Richards Minot. 72
  • To George Richards Minot. 75
  • To Thomas Dwight. 77
  • To George Richards Minot. 79
  • To Thomas Dwight. 83
  • To Thomas Dwight. 85
  • To Thomas Dwight. 88
  • To Thomas Dwight. 90
  • To Thomas Dwight. 91
  • To Thomas Dwight. 92
  • To George Richards Minot. 94
  • To Thomas Dwight. 95
  • To Thomas Dwight. 97
  • To Thomas Dwight. 99
  • To Thomas Dwight. 99
  • To George Richards Minot. 100
  • To Thomas Dwight. 102
  • To George Richards Minot. 108
  • To Thomas Dwight. 109
  • To Thomas Dwight. 110
  • To George Richards Minot. 111
  • To Thomas Dwight. 112
  • To George Richards Minot. 113
  • To Thomas Dwight. 114
  • To Thomas Dwight. 116
  • To George Richards Minot. 118
  • To Thomas Dwight. 119
  • To Thomas Dwight. 120
  • To George Richards Minot. 123
  • To Thomas Dwight. 124
  • To Thomas Dwight. 125
  • To Thomas Dwight. 126
  • To George Richards Minot. 127
  • To Thomas Dwight. 128
  • To George Richards Minot. 129
  • To Thomas Dwight. 130
  • To Christopher Gore. 132
  • To Christopher Gore. 135
  • To Christopher Gore. 137
  • To Christopher Gore. 139
  • To Thomas Dwight. 143
  • To Thomas Dwight. 144
  • To Thomas Dwight. 146
  • To Thomas Dwight. 149
  • To Christopher Gore. 152
  • To Thomas Dwight. 153
  • To Christopher Gore. 156
  • To Thomas Dwight. 158
  • To Christopher Gore. 161
  • To George Richards Minot. 164
  • To Christopher Gore. 167
  • To Thomas Dwight. 168
  • To Thomas Dwight. 169
  • To Thomas Dwight. 170
  • To Thomas Dwight. 173
  • To Thomas Dwight. 177
  • To Dwight Foster--(in Congress.) 177
  • To Jeremiah Smith. 183
  • To Thomas Dwight. 184
  • To Thomas Dwight. 185
  • To Thomas Dwight. 186
  • To Christopher Gore. 189
  • To Thomas Dwight. 192
  • To Thomas Dwight. 192
  • To Thomas Dwight. 193
  • To Christopher Gore. 194
  • To Thomas Dwight. 195
  • To Christopher Gore. 198
  • To Thomas Dwight. 204
  • To Christopher Gore. 205
  • To Thomas Dwight. 208
  • To Christopher Gore. 211
  • To Christopher Gore. 212
  • To Hon. Timothy Pickering. 215
  • To Dwight Foster. 218
  • To James Mchenry, Secretary of War. 219
  • To Christopher Gore. 220
  • To H. G. Otis. 222
  • To Timothy Pickering. 224
  • To Dwight Foster. 226
  • To Timothy Pickering. 231
  • To Christopher Gore. 232
  • To Thomas Dwight. 239
  • To Timothy Pickering. 240
  • To Thomas Dwight. 241
  • To Christopher Gore. 243
  • To Christopher Gore. 249
  • To Thomas Dwight. 252
  • To Christopher Gore. 255
  • To Timothy Pickering. 257
  • To Thomas Dwight. 259
  • To Christopher Gore. 260
  • To T. Pickering. 265
  • To Thomas Dwight. 269
  • To John Ward Fenno, Esq., Philadelphia. 274
  • To Christopher Gore. 277
  • To Alexander Hamilton. 278
  • To Thomas Dwight. 283
  • To Christopher Gore. 285
  • To Thomas Dwight. 286
  • To Jeremiah Smith. 290
  • To Theodore Dwight. 291
  • To Thomas Dwight. 292
  • To Thomas Dwight. 295
  • To Thomas Dwight. 296
  • To Christopher Gore. 297
  • To Christopher Gore. 298
  • To Christopher Gore. 309
  • To Jeremiah Smith. 313
  • To Dwight Foster. 317
  • To Christopher Gore. 322
  • To Thomas Dwight. 333
  • To Thomas Dwight. 336
  • To Thomas Dwight. 337
  • To Josiah Quincy. 338
  • To Thomas Dwight. 341
  • To Josiah Quincy. 345
  • To Josiah Quincy. 349
  • To Thomas Dwight. 350
  • To Timothy Pickering. 354
  • To Josiah Quincy. 357
  • To Josiah Quincy. 360
  • To Timothy Pickering. 361
  • To Timothy Pickering. 366
  • To Josiah Quincy. 368
  • To Timothy Pickering. 373
  • To Josiah Quincy. 376
  • To Josiah Quincy. 379
  • To Timothy Pickering. 380
  • To Josiah Quincy. 381
  • To Timothy Pickering. 383
  • To Josiah Quincy. 390
  • To Timothy Pickering. 392
  • To Josiah Quincy. 397
  • To Josiah Quincy. 398
  • To Josiah Quincy. 404
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 406

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.