Works of Fisher Ames: With a Selection from His Speeches and Correspondence - Vol. 1

By Fisher Ames; Seth Ames | Go to book overview

upper chamber, and several upper apartments for a servant, a good cellar and two acres of ground, badly fenced, and Mr. Ivers is very loath to fence it at all. In this state of things, you will see I am not in a condition to indulge my wishes, by going to housekeeping within two or three weeks, if so soon, yet I shall have a man and maid in the house, and shall sleep there myself very soon.

Your friend, &c., in haste.

The house of the late Governor Hutchinson, near the old North Square, I hear, is to be had. But although that is the place for a public man to make influence, I cannot think of the north end.1 The house is a noble one, however.


TO THOMAS DWIGHT.

Boston, October 4, 1792.--Thursday.

DEAR FRIEND,--I embrace the opportunity afforded by the return of Mr. J. Dwight's two pretty boys, to write you, not because I have any thing interesting to inform you of, but the missing a direct opportunity seems not unlike passing by you in the street without speaking, which is a thing I should not do.

The smallpox has desolated many families in this town. Charles Bulfinch has lost two children, and two others, brought by a favorite nurse from the country, are also dead. The doctors say, they lose next to none, but every night the silent mourners steal obscurely, without tolling of bells, to the grave. I have no doubt that the malignity of the disease exceeds any thing known in this town since the art of inoculating has been successfully practised. It is said one in fifty dies; in 1777 it was only one in about two hundred.

____________________
1
The reasons why the north end was not to be thought of in 1792, were not precisely the same as would occur to the mind in 1854. It was then the most fashionable, and of course the most expensive, part of the town.

-120-

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Works of Fisher Ames: With a Selection from His Speeches and Correspondence - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Preface. iii
  • Contents of the First Volume. vii
  • Life. 1
  • Part I: Letters. 29
  • To George Richards Minot, Boston. 31
  • To George Richards Minot. 32
  • To George Richards Minot. 34
  • To George Richards Minot. 36
  • To George Richards Minot. 38
  • To George Richards Minot. 41
  • To George Richards Minot. 44
  • To George Richards Minot. 47
  • To Thomas Dwight. 50
  • To George Richards Minot. 52
  • To George Richards Minot. 53
  • To George Richards Minot. 57
  • To George Richards Minot. 61
  • To George Richards Minot. 65
  • To George Richards Minot. 66
  • To George Richards Minot. 71
  • To George Richards Minot. 72
  • To George Richards Minot. 75
  • To Thomas Dwight. 77
  • To George Richards Minot. 79
  • To Thomas Dwight. 83
  • To Thomas Dwight. 85
  • To Thomas Dwight. 88
  • To Thomas Dwight. 90
  • To Thomas Dwight. 91
  • To Thomas Dwight. 92
  • To George Richards Minot. 94
  • To Thomas Dwight. 95
  • To Thomas Dwight. 97
  • To Thomas Dwight. 99
  • To Thomas Dwight. 99
  • To George Richards Minot. 100
  • To Thomas Dwight. 102
  • To George Richards Minot. 108
  • To Thomas Dwight. 109
  • To Thomas Dwight. 110
  • To George Richards Minot. 111
  • To Thomas Dwight. 112
  • To George Richards Minot. 113
  • To Thomas Dwight. 114
  • To Thomas Dwight. 116
  • To George Richards Minot. 118
  • To Thomas Dwight. 119
  • To Thomas Dwight. 120
  • To George Richards Minot. 123
  • To Thomas Dwight. 124
  • To Thomas Dwight. 125
  • To Thomas Dwight. 126
  • To George Richards Minot. 127
  • To Thomas Dwight. 128
  • To George Richards Minot. 129
  • To Thomas Dwight. 130
  • To Christopher Gore. 132
  • To Christopher Gore. 135
  • To Christopher Gore. 137
  • To Christopher Gore. 139
  • To Thomas Dwight. 143
  • To Thomas Dwight. 144
  • To Thomas Dwight. 146
  • To Thomas Dwight. 149
  • To Christopher Gore. 152
  • To Thomas Dwight. 153
  • To Christopher Gore. 156
  • To Thomas Dwight. 158
  • To Christopher Gore. 161
  • To George Richards Minot. 164
  • To Christopher Gore. 167
  • To Thomas Dwight. 168
  • To Thomas Dwight. 169
  • To Thomas Dwight. 170
  • To Thomas Dwight. 173
  • To Thomas Dwight. 177
  • To Dwight Foster--(in Congress.) 177
  • To Jeremiah Smith. 183
  • To Thomas Dwight. 184
  • To Thomas Dwight. 185
  • To Thomas Dwight. 186
  • To Christopher Gore. 189
  • To Thomas Dwight. 192
  • To Thomas Dwight. 192
  • To Thomas Dwight. 193
  • To Christopher Gore. 194
  • To Thomas Dwight. 195
  • To Christopher Gore. 198
  • To Thomas Dwight. 204
  • To Christopher Gore. 205
  • To Thomas Dwight. 208
  • To Christopher Gore. 211
  • To Christopher Gore. 212
  • To Hon. Timothy Pickering. 215
  • To Dwight Foster. 218
  • To James Mchenry, Secretary of War. 219
  • To Christopher Gore. 220
  • To H. G. Otis. 222
  • To Timothy Pickering. 224
  • To Dwight Foster. 226
  • To Timothy Pickering. 231
  • To Christopher Gore. 232
  • To Thomas Dwight. 239
  • To Timothy Pickering. 240
  • To Thomas Dwight. 241
  • To Christopher Gore. 243
  • To Christopher Gore. 249
  • To Thomas Dwight. 252
  • To Christopher Gore. 255
  • To Timothy Pickering. 257
  • To Thomas Dwight. 259
  • To Christopher Gore. 260
  • To T. Pickering. 265
  • To Thomas Dwight. 269
  • To John Ward Fenno, Esq., Philadelphia. 274
  • To Christopher Gore. 277
  • To Alexander Hamilton. 278
  • To Thomas Dwight. 283
  • To Christopher Gore. 285
  • To Thomas Dwight. 286
  • To Jeremiah Smith. 290
  • To Theodore Dwight. 291
  • To Thomas Dwight. 292
  • To Thomas Dwight. 295
  • To Thomas Dwight. 296
  • To Christopher Gore. 297
  • To Christopher Gore. 298
  • To Christopher Gore. 309
  • To Jeremiah Smith. 313
  • To Dwight Foster. 317
  • To Christopher Gore. 322
  • To Thomas Dwight. 333
  • To Thomas Dwight. 336
  • To Thomas Dwight. 337
  • To Josiah Quincy. 338
  • To Thomas Dwight. 341
  • To Josiah Quincy. 345
  • To Josiah Quincy. 349
  • To Thomas Dwight. 350
  • To Timothy Pickering. 354
  • To Josiah Quincy. 357
  • To Josiah Quincy. 360
  • To Timothy Pickering. 361
  • To Timothy Pickering. 366
  • To Josiah Quincy. 368
  • To Timothy Pickering. 373
  • To Josiah Quincy. 376
  • To Josiah Quincy. 379
  • To Timothy Pickering. 380
  • To Josiah Quincy. 381
  • To Timothy Pickering. 383
  • To Josiah Quincy. 390
  • To Timothy Pickering. 392
  • To Josiah Quincy. 397
  • To Josiah Quincy. 398
  • To Josiah Quincy. 404
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