Works of Fisher Ames: With a Selection from His Speeches and Correspondence - Vol. 1

By Fisher Ames; Seth Ames | Go to book overview

good will be too much valued, to be lost or neglected by them. Two resources occur to my impaired hopes: one, in the real virtue and discernment of the President; the other, in the clear views our public has taken of the policy and character of the French. How the influence on the former can be impressed, so as to soothe, without shocking, his feelings, I know not. I fear it is too difficult and too late. The latter is not to be neglected. Never was there a time when our public ought to be made to see the truth more clearly. Those who seek office, and who court power, will flinch at the meeting of Congress, and the Jacobins will join them. The public is right, and ought to make its good sense and honest zeal intelligible, so that the members, who incline to act right, shall feel incited and supported.

I will disclose to you, that Governor Gill, in his proclamation, had a clause to thank God for this mission of Envoys. This was got out, and our Thanksgiving may be as free as usual from hypocrisy and nonsense. . . . . .

The temporizing, weak federal members of Congress will be tampered with, and I do not see how any thing, but a very strong impression of public sentiment, can prevent a division of the federal party. The despised and the detested already are Jacobins. Any new assortment of our citizens must, of necessity, give that bad cause better men. Perseverance in the first error may embroil the peace of the nation with England, and I greatly fear it will; and if it should, evils within and without will be numberless. But the event will be no less fatal to the peace and reputation of the author of the measure. This will be poor consolation to me, for I wish him honor and permanence in office, as much as any one.

I again request that your discretion to burn this, will supply my want of it. I am, dear sir, with great esteem,

Yours, truly.

I perceive that the Jacobins, and the half federalists, are ripe for attacking the permanent force, as expensive, and unnecessary, and dangerous to liberty. By disbanding the troops, Congress would create many malecontents and disarm authority.

-258-

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Works of Fisher Ames: With a Selection from His Speeches and Correspondence - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Preface. iii
  • Contents of the First Volume. vii
  • Life. 1
  • Part I: Letters. 29
  • To George Richards Minot, Boston. 31
  • To George Richards Minot. 32
  • To George Richards Minot. 34
  • To George Richards Minot. 36
  • To George Richards Minot. 38
  • To George Richards Minot. 41
  • To George Richards Minot. 44
  • To George Richards Minot. 47
  • To Thomas Dwight. 50
  • To George Richards Minot. 52
  • To George Richards Minot. 53
  • To George Richards Minot. 57
  • To George Richards Minot. 61
  • To George Richards Minot. 65
  • To George Richards Minot. 66
  • To George Richards Minot. 71
  • To George Richards Minot. 72
  • To George Richards Minot. 75
  • To Thomas Dwight. 77
  • To George Richards Minot. 79
  • To Thomas Dwight. 83
  • To Thomas Dwight. 85
  • To Thomas Dwight. 88
  • To Thomas Dwight. 90
  • To Thomas Dwight. 91
  • To Thomas Dwight. 92
  • To George Richards Minot. 94
  • To Thomas Dwight. 95
  • To Thomas Dwight. 97
  • To Thomas Dwight. 99
  • To Thomas Dwight. 99
  • To George Richards Minot. 100
  • To Thomas Dwight. 102
  • To George Richards Minot. 108
  • To Thomas Dwight. 109
  • To Thomas Dwight. 110
  • To George Richards Minot. 111
  • To Thomas Dwight. 112
  • To George Richards Minot. 113
  • To Thomas Dwight. 114
  • To Thomas Dwight. 116
  • To George Richards Minot. 118
  • To Thomas Dwight. 119
  • To Thomas Dwight. 120
  • To George Richards Minot. 123
  • To Thomas Dwight. 124
  • To Thomas Dwight. 125
  • To Thomas Dwight. 126
  • To George Richards Minot. 127
  • To Thomas Dwight. 128
  • To George Richards Minot. 129
  • To Thomas Dwight. 130
  • To Christopher Gore. 132
  • To Christopher Gore. 135
  • To Christopher Gore. 137
  • To Christopher Gore. 139
  • To Thomas Dwight. 143
  • To Thomas Dwight. 144
  • To Thomas Dwight. 146
  • To Thomas Dwight. 149
  • To Christopher Gore. 152
  • To Thomas Dwight. 153
  • To Christopher Gore. 156
  • To Thomas Dwight. 158
  • To Christopher Gore. 161
  • To George Richards Minot. 164
  • To Christopher Gore. 167
  • To Thomas Dwight. 168
  • To Thomas Dwight. 169
  • To Thomas Dwight. 170
  • To Thomas Dwight. 173
  • To Thomas Dwight. 177
  • To Dwight Foster--(in Congress.) 177
  • To Jeremiah Smith. 183
  • To Thomas Dwight. 184
  • To Thomas Dwight. 185
  • To Thomas Dwight. 186
  • To Christopher Gore. 189
  • To Thomas Dwight. 192
  • To Thomas Dwight. 192
  • To Thomas Dwight. 193
  • To Christopher Gore. 194
  • To Thomas Dwight. 195
  • To Christopher Gore. 198
  • To Thomas Dwight. 204
  • To Christopher Gore. 205
  • To Thomas Dwight. 208
  • To Christopher Gore. 211
  • To Christopher Gore. 212
  • To Hon. Timothy Pickering. 215
  • To Dwight Foster. 218
  • To James Mchenry, Secretary of War. 219
  • To Christopher Gore. 220
  • To H. G. Otis. 222
  • To Timothy Pickering. 224
  • To Dwight Foster. 226
  • To Timothy Pickering. 231
  • To Christopher Gore. 232
  • To Thomas Dwight. 239
  • To Timothy Pickering. 240
  • To Thomas Dwight. 241
  • To Christopher Gore. 243
  • To Christopher Gore. 249
  • To Thomas Dwight. 252
  • To Christopher Gore. 255
  • To Timothy Pickering. 257
  • To Thomas Dwight. 259
  • To Christopher Gore. 260
  • To T. Pickering. 265
  • To Thomas Dwight. 269
  • To John Ward Fenno, Esq., Philadelphia. 274
  • To Christopher Gore. 277
  • To Alexander Hamilton. 278
  • To Thomas Dwight. 283
  • To Christopher Gore. 285
  • To Thomas Dwight. 286
  • To Jeremiah Smith. 290
  • To Theodore Dwight. 291
  • To Thomas Dwight. 292
  • To Thomas Dwight. 295
  • To Thomas Dwight. 296
  • To Christopher Gore. 297
  • To Christopher Gore. 298
  • To Christopher Gore. 309
  • To Jeremiah Smith. 313
  • To Dwight Foster. 317
  • To Christopher Gore. 322
  • To Thomas Dwight. 333
  • To Thomas Dwight. 336
  • To Thomas Dwight. 337
  • To Josiah Quincy. 338
  • To Thomas Dwight. 341
  • To Josiah Quincy. 345
  • To Josiah Quincy. 349
  • To Thomas Dwight. 350
  • To Timothy Pickering. 354
  • To Josiah Quincy. 357
  • To Josiah Quincy. 360
  • To Timothy Pickering. 361
  • To Timothy Pickering. 366
  • To Josiah Quincy. 368
  • To Timothy Pickering. 373
  • To Josiah Quincy. 376
  • To Josiah Quincy. 379
  • To Timothy Pickering. 380
  • To Josiah Quincy. 381
  • To Timothy Pickering. 383
  • To Josiah Quincy. 390
  • To Timothy Pickering. 392
  • To Josiah Quincy. 397
  • To Josiah Quincy. 398
  • To Josiah Quincy. 404
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