Works of Fisher Ames: With a Selection from His Speeches and Correspondence - Vol. 1

By Fisher Ames; Seth Ames | Go to book overview

remembrance of it be lost. As a party, it is still good for every thing it ever was good for; that is to say, to cry "fire" and "stop thief," when Jacobinism attempts to burn and rob. It never had the power to put out the fire, or to seize the thief.

Nor should too much maiden modesty be affected about causing your speeches to be carefully corrected and printed. It is respectful towards the public to expose reasons, as if we could comprehend or would regard them. S. H. Smith is too partial to be trusted with that business.

I am glad Randolph's mouth is at last open.

Your friend.


TO JOSIAH QUINCY.

Dedham, February 3, 1807.

MY DEAR SIR,--As soon as I learned where your salt speech could be found in print with any correctness, I took measures to get it republished. It is in the Repertory of this day, and is, I say it without compliment, an ornament to its columns. I am as well satisfied with what you do not say, but only hint, as if you had said it in form. Your argument is sound, and the subject is presented in the right point of view. No man seldomer says flattering things to his friends than I do; and if I had waited a week after reading your speech, I should have been more stingy of praise. Having just read it, I cannot wholly suppress my warmth of approbation. Let me repeat that you should not be too modest about getting your speeches into print correctly. It is the public that is argued with; that public that always pronounces its judgment, and seldom condescends to give its attention; that is almost always wrong in the hour of deliberation, and right in the day of repentance. Federalism is allowed to have little to do with deliberation; and I am far from certain that popular repentance is often accompanied with saving grace. We are not so truly sorry for the sin, as for its bad success. To get people to think

-392-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Works of Fisher Ames: With a Selection from His Speeches and Correspondence - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Preface. iii
  • Contents of the First Volume. vii
  • Life. 1
  • Part I: Letters. 29
  • To George Richards Minot, Boston. 31
  • To George Richards Minot. 32
  • To George Richards Minot. 34
  • To George Richards Minot. 36
  • To George Richards Minot. 38
  • To George Richards Minot. 41
  • To George Richards Minot. 44
  • To George Richards Minot. 47
  • To Thomas Dwight. 50
  • To George Richards Minot. 52
  • To George Richards Minot. 53
  • To George Richards Minot. 57
  • To George Richards Minot. 61
  • To George Richards Minot. 65
  • To George Richards Minot. 66
  • To George Richards Minot. 71
  • To George Richards Minot. 72
  • To George Richards Minot. 75
  • To Thomas Dwight. 77
  • To George Richards Minot. 79
  • To Thomas Dwight. 83
  • To Thomas Dwight. 85
  • To Thomas Dwight. 88
  • To Thomas Dwight. 90
  • To Thomas Dwight. 91
  • To Thomas Dwight. 92
  • To George Richards Minot. 94
  • To Thomas Dwight. 95
  • To Thomas Dwight. 97
  • To Thomas Dwight. 99
  • To Thomas Dwight. 99
  • To George Richards Minot. 100
  • To Thomas Dwight. 102
  • To George Richards Minot. 108
  • To Thomas Dwight. 109
  • To Thomas Dwight. 110
  • To George Richards Minot. 111
  • To Thomas Dwight. 112
  • To George Richards Minot. 113
  • To Thomas Dwight. 114
  • To Thomas Dwight. 116
  • To George Richards Minot. 118
  • To Thomas Dwight. 119
  • To Thomas Dwight. 120
  • To George Richards Minot. 123
  • To Thomas Dwight. 124
  • To Thomas Dwight. 125
  • To Thomas Dwight. 126
  • To George Richards Minot. 127
  • To Thomas Dwight. 128
  • To George Richards Minot. 129
  • To Thomas Dwight. 130
  • To Christopher Gore. 132
  • To Christopher Gore. 135
  • To Christopher Gore. 137
  • To Christopher Gore. 139
  • To Thomas Dwight. 143
  • To Thomas Dwight. 144
  • To Thomas Dwight. 146
  • To Thomas Dwight. 149
  • To Christopher Gore. 152
  • To Thomas Dwight. 153
  • To Christopher Gore. 156
  • To Thomas Dwight. 158
  • To Christopher Gore. 161
  • To George Richards Minot. 164
  • To Christopher Gore. 167
  • To Thomas Dwight. 168
  • To Thomas Dwight. 169
  • To Thomas Dwight. 170
  • To Thomas Dwight. 173
  • To Thomas Dwight. 177
  • To Dwight Foster--(in Congress.) 177
  • To Jeremiah Smith. 183
  • To Thomas Dwight. 184
  • To Thomas Dwight. 185
  • To Thomas Dwight. 186
  • To Christopher Gore. 189
  • To Thomas Dwight. 192
  • To Thomas Dwight. 192
  • To Thomas Dwight. 193
  • To Christopher Gore. 194
  • To Thomas Dwight. 195
  • To Christopher Gore. 198
  • To Thomas Dwight. 204
  • To Christopher Gore. 205
  • To Thomas Dwight. 208
  • To Christopher Gore. 211
  • To Christopher Gore. 212
  • To Hon. Timothy Pickering. 215
  • To Dwight Foster. 218
  • To James Mchenry, Secretary of War. 219
  • To Christopher Gore. 220
  • To H. G. Otis. 222
  • To Timothy Pickering. 224
  • To Dwight Foster. 226
  • To Timothy Pickering. 231
  • To Christopher Gore. 232
  • To Thomas Dwight. 239
  • To Timothy Pickering. 240
  • To Thomas Dwight. 241
  • To Christopher Gore. 243
  • To Christopher Gore. 249
  • To Thomas Dwight. 252
  • To Christopher Gore. 255
  • To Timothy Pickering. 257
  • To Thomas Dwight. 259
  • To Christopher Gore. 260
  • To T. Pickering. 265
  • To Thomas Dwight. 269
  • To John Ward Fenno, Esq., Philadelphia. 274
  • To Christopher Gore. 277
  • To Alexander Hamilton. 278
  • To Thomas Dwight. 283
  • To Christopher Gore. 285
  • To Thomas Dwight. 286
  • To Jeremiah Smith. 290
  • To Theodore Dwight. 291
  • To Thomas Dwight. 292
  • To Thomas Dwight. 295
  • To Thomas Dwight. 296
  • To Christopher Gore. 297
  • To Christopher Gore. 298
  • To Christopher Gore. 309
  • To Jeremiah Smith. 313
  • To Dwight Foster. 317
  • To Christopher Gore. 322
  • To Thomas Dwight. 333
  • To Thomas Dwight. 336
  • To Thomas Dwight. 337
  • To Josiah Quincy. 338
  • To Thomas Dwight. 341
  • To Josiah Quincy. 345
  • To Josiah Quincy. 349
  • To Thomas Dwight. 350
  • To Timothy Pickering. 354
  • To Josiah Quincy. 357
  • To Josiah Quincy. 360
  • To Timothy Pickering. 361
  • To Timothy Pickering. 366
  • To Josiah Quincy. 368
  • To Timothy Pickering. 373
  • To Josiah Quincy. 376
  • To Josiah Quincy. 379
  • To Timothy Pickering. 380
  • To Josiah Quincy. 381
  • To Timothy Pickering. 383
  • To Josiah Quincy. 390
  • To Timothy Pickering. 392
  • To Josiah Quincy. 397
  • To Josiah Quincy. 398
  • To Josiah Quincy. 404
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 406

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.