West African Trade: A Study of Competition, Oligopoly and Monopoly in a Changing Economy

By P. T. Bauer | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 16
THE BUYING ORGANIZATIONS AND METHODS OF THE MERCHANTS AND OF OTHER INTERMEDIARIES IN THE EXPORT TRADE

1. PRE-WAR ORGANIZATION OF THE EXPORT TRADE

Before the war the merchants acted as principals in the purchase and shipment of export produce. The firms bought produce at their buying stations, which were generally situated up-country in, or close to, the areas of production.

The actual buying for the firms was undertaken by their clerks or by various categories of middlemen who depended, in differing degrees, upon the firms' funds, premises, labour, equipment and so on. The clerks bought direct from producers, from middlemen who had collected small parcels from producers, or from other smaller intermediaries. Many of the more substantial middlemen had their own organization of employees and sub-middlemen, often running parallel with those of the merchant firms. Thus a middleman selling to an intermediary acting for a particular trading firm often competed with other intermediaries also buying for that firm, and/or with that firm's salaried employees engaged in produce buying.1

The middlemen were paid commission by the merchant firms; moreover, they kept any differences between the prices they paid for produce and those they received from the firms. Some of the smaller middlemen received agreed payments (as salaries), as well as commission on purchases. Clerks also sometimes received small commission payments, as well as their salaries.1

____________________
1
The analogy will be readyily perceived with the organization of the import trade, where customers of the import merchants often sell merchandize in competition with the semi-wholesale and retail establishments of the firms from which they buy their own supplies.
1
This short summary sets out the essentials of the pre-war buying organizations of the merchant firms. In practice the features were often blurred by local terminology, by having distinctive names for different types of middlemen. A useful detailed description of the organization of cocoa buying before the war is presented in the Report of the Commission on the Marketing of West African Cocoa, Cmd. 5845, 1938 (the Nowell Report), chapters IV and VIII. A description of the post-war buying organization of the United Africa.Company is presented in the Statistical and Economic Review of the United Africa Company, September 1948 (cocoa), March 1949 (oil-palm produce), September 1949 (groundnuts) and September 1951 (cotton). In general, the organization of the other firms is on similar lines though on a smaller scale.

-202-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
West African Trade: A Study of Competition, Oligopoly and Monopoly in a Changing Economy
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 450

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.