CHAPTER VIII
PROPAGANDA AND POLITICS

"Within the past twenty years," says Burns, "the machinery of government, as it is now significantly called, has been as rapidly transformed as the types of industrial machine. New models of command and obedience, control and coöperation, are being tried in countries where medieval customs were dominant until the Great War. The three great European Empires of Germany, Austria-Hungary, and Russia have collapsed; in China and Turkey ancient monarchies have given place to Republics. The Son of Heaven and the Caliph have followed the Emperor of the Holy Roman Empire into the past. Dethroned and exiled emperors, kings, and princes have taken refuge among the democratic societies of the West. Personal or party dictatorship has been set up in Russia, Turkey, Persia, Yugoslavia, Poland, and Italy. Veiled dictatorships of the same kind are to be found in China, Egypt, and elsewhere."1

Here we have, well-digested, some indices of modern political change, its rapidity, and its radicalness. In all of this catastrophic change we are able to see a vast amount of heroic struggle; and struggle, as we have pointed out, seems ever to be accompanied by propaganda. We cannot possibly survey all of the struggles connected with the few changes indicated by Burns. All we can hope to do here is to dip our small bucket into the stream of political change at a few places and examine the contents that we draw up. We must confine ourselves mainly to the United States. Although the changes here have not been so vast, at least on the surface, political struggle is endless, and we have a rather free play of public influence which means a vast amount of propaganda. We may properly begin with

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1
C. D. Burns, Modern Civilization on Trial, p. 121.

-184-

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