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Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • East, West, North, and South Of a Man 3
  • Evelyn Ray 14
  • The Swans 24
  • Once Jericho 29
  • Merely Statement 32
  • Footing Up a Total 34
  • Twenty-Four Hokku on A Modern Theme 37
  • The Anniversary 44
  • Song for a Viola D'Amore 49
  • Prime 52
  • Vespers 53
  • In Excelsis 54
  • White Currants 58
  • Exercise in Logic 60
  • Overcast Sunrise 61
  • Afterglow 62
  • A Dimension 63
  • Mackerel Sky 64
  • The On-Looker 66
  • Lilacs 68
  • Purple Grackles 75
  • Meeting-House Hill 82
  • Texas 84
  • Charleston. South Carolina 88
  • The Middleton Place 90
  • The Vow 92
  • The Congressional Library 97
  • Which, Being Interpreted, is As May Be, or Otherwise, 104
  • The Sisters 127
  • View of Teignmouth In Devonshire 138
  • Fool O' the Moon 154
  • Tomb Valley 159
  • The Green Parrakeet 167
  • Time's Acre 174
  • Sultry 179
  • The Enchanted Castle - To Edgar Allan Poe 182
  • Autumn and Death 184
  • Folie De Minuit 187
  • The Slippers of the Goddess Of Beauty 191
  • The Watershed 193
  • A Ronde Du Diable 196
  • Morning Song, with Drums 199
  • Grave Song 200
  • A Rhyme Out of Motley 201
  • The Red Knight 202
  • Nuit Blanche 204
  • Orientation 206
  • Pantomime in One Act 208
  • In a Powder Closet Early Eighteenth Century 212
  • Attitude Under an Elm Tree 214
  • On Reading a Line Underscored By Keats - In a Copy of "Palmerin of England" 216
  • The Humming-Birds 218
  • Summer Night Piece 220
  • Wind and Silver 221
  • Night Clouds 222
  • Fugitive 223
  • The Sand Altar 224
  • Time-Web 225
  • Preface to an Occasion 226
  • Primavera 228
  • Katydids Shore of Lake Michigan 230
  • To Carl Sandburg 231
  • If I Were Francesco Guardi 234
  • Eleonora Duse 235
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