The Origins of Nazi Genocide: From Euthanasia to the Final Solution

By Henry Friedlander | Go to book overview

Chapter 7 The Expanded Killing Program

Hitler's stop order did not end the killings; they soon continued in German hospitals by other means. At the same time, however, the killings expanded to include inmates of the concentration camps. The involvement of the SS should come as no surprise. Although the KdF had directed the killings in Germany, and the role of the SS had been minimal, Himmler's men did not restrain themselves on the borders of the Reich and in the newly occupied Polish territories, killing the handicapped even before the euthanasia murders had started inside Germany.

The first handicapped victims were executed. They were handicapped patients from various state hospitals and nursing homes in Pomerania, the Prussian province bordering on Poland in the north.1 As the war started, Reich Leader SS Heinrich Himmler and Franz Schwede-Coburg, who served in Pomerania as both Gauleiter and Oberpräsident (provincial governor), reached an agreement, which provided for the transfer to the SS of a number of Pomeranian state hospitals. The patients of these hospitals were evacuated. While some were transferred to other institutions, those judged incurable and those without concerned relatives were simply killed.

These early euthanasia killings took place without the cover of medical evaluation, the subterfuge of condolence letters, or the use of sophisticated technology. Instead, they employed the primitive method of mass execution. These killings of the handicapped happened at the same time that the RMdI mailed the first questionnaires to hospitals in Württemberg and before the first experimental gassing occurred at Brandenburg. They showed that once the decision was made to kill the handicapped, only pragmatic concerns would limit the means. In the Reich, public opinion imposed restraints that required subterfuge, but in wartime such limitations did not apply in the East.

The job of killing the Pomeranian patients was given to the SS in neighboring Danzig-West Prussia, a newly created German province encompassing the former Free City of Danzig and the area of West Prussia seized from Poland. Specifically, the task was assigned to SS Major (Sturmbannführer) Kurt Eimann, commander of an auxiliary police unit formed in the summer of 1939 from about 2,000 members of the Danzig City SS Regiment and known as the Eimann Battalion (Sturmbann).

The handicapped patients from Pomerania arrived by train at the town of Neustadt in West Prussia and were killed in a forest nearby. Polish political prisoners from the SS prison camp Stutthof near Danzig dug large pits to

-136-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Origins of Nazi Genocide: From Euthanasia to the Final Solution
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Table of Contents vii
  • Tables ix
  • Preface xi
  • Acknowledgments xv
  • Abbreviations xix
  • Note on Language xxi
  • Chapter 1 - The Setting 1
  • Chapter 2 - Excluding the Handicapped 23
  • Chapter 3 - Killing Handicapped Children 39
  • Chapter 4 - Killing Handicapped Adults 63
  • Chapter 5 - The Killing Centers 86
  • Chapter 6 - Toward the Killing Pause 111
  • Chapter 7 - The Expanded Killing Program 136
  • Chapter 8 - The Continued Killing Program 151
  • Chapter 9 - The Handicapped Victims 164
  • Chapter 10 - Managers and Supervisors 187
  • Chapter 11 - Physicians and Other Killers 216
  • Chapter 12 - Excluding Gypsies 246
  • Chapter 13 - Killing Handicapped Jews 263
  • Chapter 14 - The Final Solution 284
  • Notes 303
  • Bibliography 385
  • Index 403
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 421

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.