Salammbo: A Romance of Ancient Carthage

By Gustave Flaubert; M. French Sheldon | Go to book overview

CHAPTER II
AT SICCA.

TWO days later the Mercenaries left Carthage. To each soldier was given a piece of money, upon the stipulated condition that he should go into camp at Sicca, and they were told, upon their departure from the city, with all manner of fawning:

"You are the saviours of Carthage, but you will certainly starve her if you remain here, for the city will become insolvent. You must, for your own preservation, withdraw; but by such a concession you will secure the Republic's goodwill. We will immediately levy taxes to complete your payment, and equip galleys to conduct you to your native countries."

The soldiers did not know what response to make to such discourses. These men, accustomed to war, becoming weary of sojourning in the city, were not difficult to convince. The entire populace of Carthage mounted on the city walls to watch the departing soldiers, as they defiled through the street of Khamoûn by the gate of Cirta, pellmell--archers with hoplites, captains with com

-26-

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Salammbo: A Romance of Ancient Carthage
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction. ix
  • Chapter I - The Feast. 1
  • Chapter II - At Sicca. 26
  • Chapter III - Salammbo 55
  • Chapter IV - Under the Walls of Carthage. 66
  • Chapter V - Tanit. 91
  • Chapter VI - Hanno. 112
  • Chapter VII - Hamilcar Barca. 140
  • Chapter VIII - The Battle of the Macar. 192
  • Chapter IX - The Campaign. 218
  • Chapter X - The Serpent 239
  • Chapter XI - In the Tent. 256
  • Chapter XII - The Aqueduct 282
  • Chapter XIII - Moloch. 309
  • Chapter XIV - The Defile of the Battle-Axe. 358
  • Chapter XV - Mâtho. 409
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