Salammbo: A Romance of Ancient Carthage

By Gustave Flaubert; M. French Sheldon | Go to book overview

their haunches, looked fixedly before them, or, half lost in their profuse manes, slept, rolled up like a ball. All appeared to be satiated, wearied, and listless. They were as motionless as the mountain, or as the dead. Night fell; wide red bands streaked the western sky.

In one of the heaps irregularly embossing the plain, something more weird than a spectre arose; then one of the lions commenced to move, cutting with his monstrous form a black shadow on the background of the impurpled sky. When he was near the man he felled him with a single blow of his paw. Then, stretched flat on his belly, with his fangs he slowly drew out the entrails.

Afterwards he opened his jaws wide, and for some minutes uttered a long, deep roar, which reechoed in the mountains repeatedly, and was lost at last in the solitude.

All at once gravel rolled from above; then came the pattering of many rapid steps, and from the side of the portcullis and from the gorge appeared pointed snouts and straight ears, and yellow eyeballs gleamed. These were the jackals, come to devour the remains.

The Carthaginian who was watching as he leant over the edge of the precipice, returned to Carthage.

-408-

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Salammbo: A Romance of Ancient Carthage
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction. ix
  • Chapter I - The Feast. 1
  • Chapter II - At Sicca. 26
  • Chapter III - Salammbo 55
  • Chapter IV - Under the Walls of Carthage. 66
  • Chapter V - Tanit. 91
  • Chapter VI - Hanno. 112
  • Chapter VII - Hamilcar Barca. 140
  • Chapter VIII - The Battle of the Macar. 192
  • Chapter IX - The Campaign. 218
  • Chapter X - The Serpent 239
  • Chapter XI - In the Tent. 256
  • Chapter XII - The Aqueduct 282
  • Chapter XIII - Moloch. 309
  • Chapter XIV - The Defile of the Battle-Axe. 358
  • Chapter XV - Mâtho. 409
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