The Political Parties of To-Day: A Study in Republican and Democratic Politics

By Arthur N. Holcombe | Go to book overview

APPENDIX A
THE POLITICAL SECTIONS

The choice of names for the different political sections of the United States presents a difficult problem. The original sections comprised only thirteen states, all of which were located on the Atlantic seaboard. Comparatively few of the American people lived more than a hundred miles from tide-water. By the expression, Eastern states, politicians meant, when Washington was President, the New England states. The West began in the valley of the Mohawk in New York state, or even in Vermont, and extended along the valleys between the Appalachian mountain ranges to Georgia. It included also the uplands and back-country between the most easterly ridges of the Appalachians and the fall line which generally marked the head of navigation on the rivers flowing into the Atlantic. Mason and Dixon's line, separating Pennsylvania from Maryland, was the boundary between North and. South.

But now those sectional lines are obsolete. Delaware, Maryland, and West Virginia, have more in common with ' Pennsylvania and the other Middle Atlantic states, from the standpoint of the national politician, than with Virginia and the other states to the South. And the West has moved steadily westwards, until it has reached the Pacific coast. The West of Washington's time is now the East; the West of Andrew Jackson's time is now more East than West; the West of Lincoln's time is now the Center of the country. Geographical expressions in American politics have a significance which is relative not only to the points of the compass but also to the periods of history. Any particular choice of terms for designating the different sections must therefore be more or less arbitrary. None can be well suited to more than one period in the history of national politics.

It has seemed most convenient to use for the major political sections the expressions which are best suited to the period when the present partisan alignment was established, that of the struggle over slavery, and to reserve for the minor sections the terms which are most appropriate at the present day. The sectional nomenclature which, consistently with this plan, is employed in this book is shown

-385-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Political Parties of To-Day: A Study in Republican and Democratic Politics
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 399

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.