Bolivar and the Independence of Spanish America

By J. B. Trend | Go to book overview

Chapter Ten
Disillusion

AFTER the victory of Ayacucho in 1824 and the triumphal progress to Potosí, Bolívar's fortunes declined. It is not enough to look for explanation in a physical or mental decline in the Liberator himself. He was prematurely aged, of course; but the arduous campaigns and the sudden changes of climate had done him less harm than indigestion or the air of Lima, the sweet cakes, and the perpetual adoration of incautious admirers, whose hymns to him were sung in the cathedral between the epistle and the gospel. Love-affairs have been alleged a cause of decline; but it is not proved that Bolívar was more amorous than many of his contemporaries. Women threw themselves at him, but he seems to have been no more sensual than the mean sensual man. To some he seemed less so; in London-- the London of the Regent, of Rowlandson and Gilray--he had been mistaken for algún griego pederasta. Since the death of his wife he had never married again, and though never promiscuous like Miranda, after 1813 he was seldom without a maîtresse en titre.

The middle years were filled with the conscious

-224-

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Bolivar and the Independence of Spanish America
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • A General Introduction to The Series v
  • Contents ix
  • Preface xi
  • Chapter One In the Spanish Colonies 1
  • Chapter Three The First Venezuelan Republic 52
  • Chapter Four The Reconquest of Venezuela 87
  • Chapter Five From Jamaica to Angostura: Political Thought 111
  • Chapter Six Crossing the Andes 143
  • Chapter Seven Bolívar and San Martín 160
  • Chapter Eight "Emperor of the Andes" 186
  • Chapter Nine The Panamá Congress 206
  • Chapter Ten Disillusion 224
  • Chapter Eleven Rejection 247
  • Appendix Notes on Books 269
  • Index 279
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