The Soviet State: A Study of Bolshevik Rule

By Bertram W. Maxwell | Go to book overview

CHAPTER II
THE COMING OF THE SOVIETS

THE CREATION OF THE SOVIET STATE

The creation of the Soviet state cannot be ascribed merely to the miseries which followed the World War. The Soviets are a result of centuries of oppression and ignorance which unfortunately cannot be described here. It is the intention of this brief introduction to indicate events which led to the formation of the present régime. When war was declared in 1914 against Germany, old animosities were forgotten, and the people rushed to arms with great enthusiasm. It appeared that a victorious war would restore the prestige of the tsar, but early in the war even the more intelligent, conservative elements realized that they were dancing on a volcano. The most moderate suggestions for reform in the Duma were answered by the adjournment of that body. By 1916 because of corruption, peculation, and graft on the part of the government, starvation and famine stalked the streets of cities. The situation was so critical that even the members of the imperial court, who were far removed from the people, could see the danger ahead and became frightened and frantically implored the tsar to establish a responsible government. Instead the emperor, under the influence of his consort, prorogued the Duma; but the fat was in the fire, the days of unquestioning obedience were over, and the parliament refused to obey the imperial command. In the meantime, the mighty, force of popular resentment broke out. There were bread riots on the streets of the large cities. The parliamentary leaders were, however, cautious in their actions and constituting themselves into a "Provisional Committee of the Duma" oscillated between joining the people and making a last appeal to the tsar; but the governmental structure was rotten to the core and even at the slight impact of an unorganized popular riot, it collapsed. The Provisional Committee was forced by popular pressure to transform

-16-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Soviet State: A Study of Bolshevik Rule
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 386

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.