The Soviet State: A Study of Bolshevik Rule

By Bertram W. Maxwell | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XII
CIVIL LIBERTY

INTRODUCTION

In attempting to describe the concepts of civil liberty under the Soviets, one is confronted with difficulties and paradoxes. The temptation to compare the state of affairs in Russia with that in Western Europe, especially conditions as they exist in the Anglo- American world, drives one nigh to despair. It is only when one constantly keeps in mind the historic background of Russia, and conditions under which the Russian people have lived for centuries that he can understand the philosophy of the Bolshevik state. There never was any liberty in Russia; the people from the very beginning of their political existence were ruled by some autocracy or other; the great movements, such as the religious revolts in the fifteenth, sixteenth, and seventeenth centuries, and political revolutions in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries which rocked the foundations of the Western world, never penetrated Russia. Sporadic attempts by small idealistic groups were crushed ruthlessly with much blood and cruelty. Thus the traditional conceptions of liberty, such as are an integral part of the West, were known to only a very few in Russia, and those were far removed from the masses socially and economically. The revolutionary movement of the nineteenth and the first decade of the twentieth century was confined to a narrow intellectual group who, after great sacrifices, succeeded in persuading a minority of the skilled workmen in the larger centers of the empire to join. Since the majority of the population consisted of nearly 85 per cent of peasants, illiterate and superstituous, engaged in a terrific struggle to keep body and soul together, there could be no question of mass movements for liberties as are known to Western Europe. To be sure there were peasant uprisings in Russia, but the desire of the peasant was for more land,

-200-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Soviet State: A Study of Bolshevik Rule
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 386

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.