An Enemy of the People: The Wild Duck: Rosmersholm

By Henrik Ibsen; James McFarlane | Go to book overview

ACT FOUR

A large, old-fashioned room in the house of CAPTAIN HORSTER. At the back of the room, double doors open on to an anteroom. On the wall, left, are three windows; against the opposite wall is a dais, on which is a small table, and on it two candles, a water carafe, a glass, and a bell.

The room is additionally lit by wall lamps between the windows. Downstage left, a table with candles and a chair. Down right is a door, and beside it a couple of chairs.

There is a big crowd of townspeople of all classes. A few women and one or two schoolboys can be seen among them. More and more people keep coming in through the door at the back, filling up the room.

FIRST MAN [bumping into another man]. Hello, Lamstad! You here as well?

SECOND MAN. I never miss a public meeting.

THIRD MAN. I expect you've brought your whistle?

SECOND MAN. You bet I have. Haven't you?

THIRD MAN. I'll say I have. Skipper Evensen said he was going to bring his great big cow-horn.

SECOND MAN. Good old Evensen!

[Laughter in the group.]

FOURTH MAN [joining them]. Here, I say, what's going on here tonight?

SECOND MAN. It's Dr. Stockmann. He's holding a protest meeting against the Mayor.

FOURTH MAN. But the Mayor's his brother!

FIRST MAN. That doesn't matter. Dr. Stockmann's not frightened.

THIRD MAN. But he's got it all wrong. It said so in the Herald.

SECOND MAN. Yes, he must be wrong this time, because nobody would let him have a hall for his meeting--Ratepayers Association, Men's Club, nobody!

-67-

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An Enemy of the People: The Wild Duck: Rosmersholm
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Oxford World's Classics i
  • Oxford World's Classics ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Introduction ix
  • Select Bibliography xxvi
  • Chronology of Henrik Ibsen xxix
  • An Enemy of the People [en Folkefiende] Play in Five Acts (1882) 1
  • Act One 3
  • Act Two 22
  • Act Three 44
  • Act Four 67
  • Act Five 86
  • The Wild Duck 107
  • Act One 109
  • Act Two 129
  • Act Three 152
  • Act Four 177
  • Act Five 200
  • Rosmersholm [rosmersholms] Play in Four Acts (1886) 221
  • Act One 223
  • Act Two 249
  • Act Three 274
  • Act Four 295
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